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Past Events

4/25: Book Event: The Revolt of the Provinces with author Kristóf Szombati

4/25: Book Event: The Revolt of the Provinces with author Kristóf Szombati

04/25/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room C198, CUNY Graduate Center

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics invites you:

Book Event: The Revolt of the Provinces with author Kristóf Szombati,

in discussion with Andrew Arato and Mary N. Taylor, moderated by Ida Susser

Wednesday April 25th,

6:30p – 8:30p 

Room C198

CUNY Graduate Center,

365 5th Ave, NY, NY 10016

© Photo by Polina Georgescu

The Revolt of the Provinces (forthcoming May 2018 Berghahn) is the first in-depth ethnographic monograph on the New Right in Central and Eastern Europe, The Revolt of the Provinces explores the making of right-wing hegemony in Hungary over the last decade. It explains the spread of racist sensibilities in depressed rural areas, shows how activists, intellectuals and politicians took advantage of popular racism to empower right-wing agendas and examines the new ruling party’s success in stabilizing an ‘illiberal regime’. To illuminate these important dynamics, the author proposes an innovative multi-scalar and relational framework, focusing on interaction between social antagonisms emerging on the local level and struggles waged within the political public sphere.


Kristóf Szombati is Istvan Deak Visiting Professor at Columbia University. He has a background in both politics and academia. He co-founded the green LMP party and was an elected member of its Steering Committee until 2010 when he left party politics to pursue a PhD at Central European University (CEU). He completed the latter in 2016 and received CEU’s Best Dissertation award for his work. Besides writing the book, he has also published articles on radical right-wing politics in Hungary and on the intersection of politics, ethnicity and ‘race’.

 

Andrew Arato (PhD 1975, University of Chicago) is the Dorothy Hart Hirshon Professor in Political and Social Theory at the New School for Social Research in New York. He has taught at L’École des hautes études and Sciences Po in Paris, as well as at the Central European University in Budapest. He had a Fulbright teaching grant to Montevideo in 1991, and was Distinguished Fulbright Professor at the Goethe University in Frankfurt/M,Germany. Professor Arato has served as a consultant for the Hungarian Parliament on constitutional issues (1996-1997), and as U.S. State Department Democracy Lecturer and Consultant (on Constitutional issues) on Nepal (2007). He was re-appointed by the State Department in the same capacity for Zimbabwe (November of 2010), where he had discussions with civil society activists and political leaders in charge of the constitution-making process. He was invited Professor at the College de France (Spring 2012).

Professor Arato’s scholarly research is widely recognized, and conferences and sessions have been organized around his work at University of Glasgow Law School (Spring 2009) and Koc University, Istanbul (December 2009), as well as at the Faculty of Law, Witwaterstrand University, Johannesburg, South Africa (August 2010). Arato was appointed Honorary Professor and Bram Fischer Visiting Scholar at the School of Law, University of Witwatersrand Johannesburg (June 2010-June 2011). Among his publications are Adventures of the Constituent Power (Cambridge University Press, 2017); Post Sovereign Constitution Making: Learning and Legitimacy(Oxford University Press, 2016); Critical Theory and Democracy (A Festschrift for Arato) (Routledge, 2013); Constitution Making Under Occupation: The Politics of Imposed Revolution Iraq (Columbia, 2009); Civil Society, Constitution, and Legitimacy (Rowman & Littlefield, 2000); Habermas on Law, Democracy, and Legitimacy: Critical Exchanges, co-editor with Michael Rosenfield (University of California, 1998); From Neo-Marxism to Democratic Theory: Essays on the Critical Theory of Soviet-Type Societies (Routledge, 1994); Civil Society and Political Theory, co-author with Jean L. Cohen (MIT, 1992). 

Mary N. Taylor is Assistant Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  Her research focuses on sites, techniques and politics of civic cultivation, social movement, and cultural management; the relationship of ethics and aesthetics to nationalism and cultural differentiation, and people’s movements in interwar, socialist and postsocialist Hungary, East Europe, and the Balkans. She is a member of the editorial collective of LeftEast, co-organizer of an annual roving summer school on ‘neoliberalizing postsocialism’, and co-founder of the Brooklyn Laundry Social Club. Her writing has been published in an array of fora, including Focaal–European Journal of Anthropology, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, Journal of Hungarian Studies, The Journal of Nationalism and Ethnicity, Bajo el Volcan, and LeftEast. She edited Critical Perspectives on the Persistence of ‘Culture Talk’ in the Making of Europe (2009 Focaal–European Journal of Anthropology 55); and co-edited (with Charlotte Huddleston, Abby Cunnane, and Sakiko Sugawa Co-Revolutionary Praxis; Accompaniment as a Strategy for Working Together (2015:  Auckland NZ: ST PAUL St. Gallery Publishing). She is currently completing her book Movement of the People: Folk Dance, Populism and Citizenship in Hungary.

This event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by The Center for Place, Culture, and Politics.

04/10: Brazil, Colombia, Haiti: Resistance and Solidarity in Times of Repression

04/10: Brazil, Colombia, Haiti: Resistance and Solidarity in Times of Repression

04/10/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
CUNY GRADUATE CENTER, Room 5409

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics invites you to:

Brazil, Colombia, Haiti: Resistance and Solidarity in Times of Repression

Tuesday, April 10th

6:30-8:30 PM

Room 5409, CUNY Graduate Center

365 5th Ave, NY, NY 10016

THIS EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS; THE DOCTORAL STUDENTS COUNCIL (DSC); CSG; THE MOVEMENT FOR PEACE IN COLOMBIA (MPC); AND DEFEND DEMOCRACY IN BRAZIL.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

03/28: Antifa and The Battle for the Real Film Screening

03/28: Antifa and The Battle for the Real Film Screening

03/28/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room C198, CUNY Graduate Center
 The Center for Place, Culture and Politics invites you to:

Antifa and The Battle for the Real Film Screening

Wednesday March 28, 2018
6:30-8:30 PM
CUNY Graduate Center
Room C198

365 5th Ave, NY, NY 10016

More about the films:

ANTIFA by Global Uprisings

Since the election of Donald Trump, acts of racist violence have proliferated across the United States. Racists and misogynists feel emboldened to express and act on their views. White nationalist groups and resurgent traditional white supremacist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan have used Trumps victory to gain new recruits. All that stands in their way are the groups of anarchists and anti-fascists who have taken it upon themselves to prevent them from becoming a powerful political force in the United States. This film tells the story of what “Antifa” is and why people are using these tactics to confront racism and fascism in the US today.

Who are the anti-fascists? What motivates them to risk their lives to fight the far right? What is the history of militant anti-fascism and why is it relevant again today? How is anti-fascism connected to a larger political vision that can stop the rise of fascism and offer us visions of a future worth fighting for? Through interviews with anti-fascist organizers, historians, and political theorists in the US and Germany, we explore the broader meaning of this political moment while taking the viewer to the scene of street battles from Washington to Berkeley and Charlottesville.

THE BATTLE FOR THE REAL by Paper Tiger Television

The landscape of new media has become a battleground over ideas. Claims of information being true or fake have shaped the nature of reality itself. This episode explores how both activists and fascists have used media tools, and calls for an ethical use of platforms.

 

The link to the series the film is part of: http://weinterruptthisprogram.org/
THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS.
02/15: Financial Markets and Land Speculation

02/15: Financial Markets and Land Speculation

02/15/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

Please join the Center for Place, Culture and Politics for Financial Markets and Land Speculation, the public facing event of the 2nd International Seminar “Pension Funds, Financial Markets and Land Speculation”:

Financial Markets and Land Speculation 

Thursday, February 15 

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Segal Theater, Ground Floor, CUNY Graduate Center

The Seminar is part of an international campaign focusing on the role of the pension fund TIAA and includes social movements and scholars from Brazil, Canada, Germany and the United States looking at financial markets, land and food systems.

Financialization is leading to new forms of land grabbing, with heavy involvement by pension funds and other financial corporations that began targeting farmland around the world after the emergence of the financial crisis in 2007-2008.

Rural communities in the Global North and in the Global South, as well as workers in the Global North whose pensions are invested in land grabbing, are both impacted and can work together to stop this trend.

The event follows the 1st International Seminar on Land Grabbing, hosted and sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics in November of 2015, with the launching of the report “Foreign pension funds and land grabbing in Brazil”, available in Portuguese, English and French:

http://www.social.org.br/index.php/pub/cartilhas-portugues/188-a-empresa-radar-s-a-e-a-especulacao-com-terras-no-brasil.html[social.org.br]

https://www.grain.org/article/entries/5336-foreign-pension-funds-and-land-grabbing-in-brazil[grain.org]

https://www.grain.org/article/entries/5337-fonds-de-pension-etrangers-et-accaparement-des-terres-au-bresil[grain.org]

 

SPEAKERS:

Maria Luisa Mendonça (Moderator) – Visiting Scholar, Center for Place, Culture and Politics, CUNY Graduate Center

Fabio Pitta – Rede Social de Justiça e Direitos Humanos (Network for Social Justice and Human Rights, Brazil)

Isolete Wichinieski – Comissão Pastoral da Terra (Pastoral Land Commission, Brazil)

Devlin Kuyek – GRAIN (Canada)

David Harvey – Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography and Director of Research, Center for Place, Culture and Politics, CUNY Graduate Center

To view the LIVESTREAM of this event: Go to videostreaming.gc.cuny.edu  and click on the link in the “Live Videos” box on the upper right hand side of the page. Click on this event.

Co-Sponsored by:

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics – CUNY Graduate Center

ActionAid USA

Comissão Pastoral da Terra (Pastoral Land Commission, Brazil)

FIAN International

Friends of the Earth, U.S.

GRAIN

Grassroots International (US)

Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

National Family Farm Coalition (US)

Presbyterian Hunger Program – PC(USA)

Rede Social de Justiça e Direitos Humanos (Network for Social Justice and Human Rights, Brazil)

WhyHunger (US)

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

02/09 (& 02/28, 03/14, 03/30): CPCP FILM SERIES: “The Militant Image” and the struggles against colonialism

02/09 (& 02/28, 03/14, 03/30): CPCP FILM SERIES: “The Militant Image” and the struggles against colonialism

02/09/2018 - 03/30/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

CPCP FILM SERIES

“The Militant Image” and the struggles against colonialism

 2/9; 2/28; 3/14; and 3/30 6:30-8:30pm SEGAL THEATER

“The militant image comprises any form of image or sound – from essay film to fiction feature, from observational documentary to found-footage ciné-pamphlet, from newsreel to agitational reworking of colonial film production – produced in through film-making practices dedicated to the liberation struggles and revolutions of the late twentieth century”. Departing from the liberation struggle against Portuguese colonial power in Guinea Bissau, this film series explores how the liberation struggles are portrayed through cinematic images. How has recovery of liberation texts, memories and images and their use by filmmakers contributed to the understanding of these revolutionary and liberatory movements.

 

2/9 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

The Two Faces of the War (Diana Andringa and Flora Gomes, 2007, 100 minutes)

This documentary shot in Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, and Portugal includes a series of interviews with and testimonies of people who lived through the period of the anticolonial war and liberation struggle in Guinea Bissau. This film sets the tone for a debate around the themes of reconciliation and historical memory in the post-conflict period of the Portuguese “colonial war” and independence struggle.

2/28 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

Mined Soil (Filipa César, 2014, 34 minutes) and The Return of Cabral (Sana N’Hada, Flora Gomes and Josefina Crato, 1976, 31 minutes)

Mined Soil revisits the work of the Guinean Agronomist Amílcar Cabral, from studying the erosion of soil in the Portuguese Alentejo region in the 1950’s through his engagement as one of the leaders of the African liberation movements. This line of inquiry intertwines with documentation of a gold mining site, operated today by a Canadian company located in the same Portuguese area once studied by Cabral.

During the independence struggle, Amílcar Cabral, co-founder of the African party for the Independence of Guinea Bissau and Cape Verde (PAIGC) was killed in 1973. The Return of Cabral documents the relocation of Cabral’s remains, which had been buried in Guinea Conakry, to Guinea Bissau to Guinea Bissau 3 years after independence was proclaimed by the PAIGC.

3/14 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

Spell Reel (Filipa César, 2016, 100 minutes)

This film is a collaborative reflection on West African political history, and the role of moving images in the creation and legacy of that history. Filmmakers Sana Na N’Hada, Flora Gomes, José Bolama Cobumba, and Josefina Crato, who studied filmmaking in Cuba at the directive of Amílcar Cabral, documented Guinea-Bissau’s independence struggle and the subsequent years of socialist rule. In 1979, Chris Marker spent several months with them, and would later integrate carnival footage shot by N’Hada into Sans Soleil. Following the 1980 military coup, many of the revolutionary films were lost; those that remained were little known and at risk of disappearing. 

 To bring these films, and often just fragments of them, back into the public eye, César has worked closely with Arsenal Institute for Film and Video Art in its initiative to preserve the history of revolutionary cinema in Guinea-Bissau through research, digitization, and dissemination of the holdings at the National Film Institute of Guinea-Bissau (INCA – Instituto Nacional de Cinema e Audiovisual).

3/30 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

The Two Faces of the War (Diana Andringa and Flora Gomes, 2007, 100 minutes) 

This documentary shot in Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, and Portugal includes a series of interviews with and testimonies of people who lived through the period of the anti-colonial war and liberation struggle in Guinea Bissau. This film sets the tone for a debate around the themes of reconciliation and historical memory in the post-conflict period of the Portuguese “colonial war” and independence struggle.

THIS SERIES IS SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS. IT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

01/09: A Dialogue on White Supremacy with Roxane Dunbar Ortiz and Ramona Africa

01/09: A Dialogue on White Supremacy with Roxane Dunbar Ortiz and Ramona Africa

01/09/2018
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Elebash Recital Hall

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics and The Campaign to Bring Mumia Home invite you to:

A Dialogue on White Supremacy with Roxane Dunbar Ortiz and Ramona Africa

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

6:00-9:00 PM

Elebash Recital Hall

CUNY Graduate Center

365 5th Ave, NY, NY 10016

A book sale for Prof. Dunbar Ortiz’s new monograph, Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment, will follow the event in Room 6107.

Ramona Africa has been a member of the MOVE organization since 1979. She was in her home on May 13, 1985 when the Philadelphia Police Department dropped a military grade bomb on her and her family’s house. The bombing killed 11 men, women, and children. In addition, the bombing destroyed one of the most vibrant Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia: 65 homes were completely burned to the ground.

Ramona was the only adult survivor along with a young boy.

Following the bombing, Ramona was charged with riot and served 7 years in prison. Since her release from prison she has traveled the world telling her story and promoting the MOVE organization.

Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, child of landless farmers.  As a veteran of the 1960s revolution, she has been involved in anti-racist, anti-colonial, anti-imperialist movements, union organizing, and was one of the founders of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the late 1960s.  Since 1973, she has focused on Native American and Ethnic Studies and worked with Indigenous communities for sovereignty and land rights and helped build the international Indigenous movement.  A historian, writer, and professor emeritus in Native American Studies at California State University, she is author of numberous Indigenous related books and articles, including An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Her most recent book is Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment.

 

 

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

THIS EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS AND THE CAMPAIGN TO BRING MUMIA HOME.

 

12/05:”A Conversation about the Cultural Representation of Labor” with Sonali Perera and Peter Hitchcock

12/05:”A Conversation about the Cultural Representation of Labor” with Sonali Perera and Peter Hitchcock

12/05/2017
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
The Graduate Center, CUNY

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics and the Postcolonial Studies Group (Graduate Center) present:

“A Conversation about the Cultural Representation of Labor”

with Sonali Perera, Hunter College, author of No Country: Working-Class Writing in the Age of Globalization (Columbia, 2014)

and

Peter Hitchcock, GC and Baruch College, author of Labor in Culture; or, Worker of the World(s) (Palgrave, 2017)

 Moderated by Shoumik Bhattacharya

 

Tuesday December 5th:

6.30pm

Room 6112  

The Graduate Center, CUNY

365 5th ave, NY, NY, 10002

 

Books will be available for purchase

 

THIS IS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

THIS EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE, AND POLITICS AND THE POST COLONIAL STUDIES GROUP  (GRADUATE CENTER).

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