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Fellowships and Eligibility

Each academic year the Center appoints six doctoral student fellows from the Graduate Center, CUNY and six CUNY faculty fellows from throughout CUNY. Fellows are drawn from programs in the social sciences, humanities, and sciences. Faculty fellows receive a two course release for the year of their fellowship (to be distributed across the fall and spring semesters at the discretion of their department), and student fellows receive a stipend of $10,000. ONLY full-time CUNY faculty are eligible for faculty fellowships, and ONLY Level III CUNY doctoral students are eligible for Graduate Fellowships. Deadlines for these fellowships are announced below once they are determined.

You can read abstracts of past fellows’ research here.

A central aspect of the Center is a weekly seminar that meets every Wednesday morning from 10 AM-12 PM. This seminar is a chance to bring student and faculty fellows together with distinguished visiting scholars around the annual theme.

You can read about this year’s seminar theme here.

The Center also offers a Post-Doctoral Fellowship position every one to two years (see below). Information on becoming a Visiting Scholar at the Center can be found here.

THE CUNY GRADUATE CENTER DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP COMPETITION FOR THE 2021-2022 ACADEMIC YEAR

[The 2022-2023 application deadline and theme will be announced by mid-December.]

Applications Due: Friday, January 15, 2021, no later than 5:00pm

The application guidelines, cover sheet, and eligibility can be found here.

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics Dissertation Fellowship is open to Level 3 students from any discipline whose research articulates with topics that have contemporary urgency, regardless of period or methodological approach. The Center runs a lively weekly seminar in which we discuss fellows’ work-in-progress. We also host distinguished lecture series and other special programming, and sponsor conferences organized around annual themes. Recent yearlong topics have included “Urban Uprisings,” “Mobilizations and Migrations,” “Consciousness and Revolution,” and “The Agrarian Question Today.” We invite dissertation fellow applicants to provide a brief statement (250-300 words) highlighting the linkages of their research with the Center’s ongoing interdisciplinary agenda.  Kindly note: acceptance of the award is contingent on being able to attend the CPCP’s Wednesday morning (10am-noon) seminar during the academic year.

The description of our spring 2021 Conference demonstrates the wide range of our engagement:

The Center for Place Culture and Politics presents our 2021 Conference:  Agrarian Questions, Urban Connections, and Planetary Possibilities

Over the last year, the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the CUNY Graduate Center has been exploring historical and current elements of the “Agrarian Question” in different territories of the planet.   The material conditions of agrarian life are deeply connected to the political, social, economic, environmental and cultural challenges of contemporary existence at a planetary scale. Agrarian spaces are central to geopolitical disputes over land and other natural resources, and rural social movements play a key role in defending biodiversity and food production. Moreover, agrarian spaces are linked to urban places through the flows of people, goods, money, information, and waste .  In this context, some questions discussed were, for example, how have regimes of capital, particularly those associated with agribusiness, industrial, financial and trading corporations fractured rural communities transnationally, and how have they been they are able to resist? How have rural social movements internationally sought an exit point from hegemonic modes of agricultural oppression and primitive accumulation? How have rural social movements connected and organized with urban social movements?

This year’s conference events from the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the Graduate Center, CUNY, will build on its discussions of these and other questions using four linked online panels and themes around fire, water, earth, and air.

Around the rubric of water, panelists will address the environmental and social impacts of rising sea levels, corporate -fishing, water pollution, and associated relations between commodity circulation and sea lanes or oceanic cable networks.  The privatization of water and water grabbing   by agribusiness, mining, dams and other predatory corporations are major threats to distribution and access of water as a human right, accentuating  that water is a primary arena of socio-economic contestation.

Similarly, using earth at a global scale, panelists will examine earth as soil, as a biodiverse base of socialization, of food production versus mono-cropping of commodities, or earth in terms of the geo-economics and labor relations of mining (rare earth metals, for instance), or the problem of soil erosion and water pollution through the use of chemical inputs based on fossil fuels, genetically modified seeds, and large irrigation systems in agribusiness plantations, which are a main cause of environmental destruction and climate change.

The theme of fire is a provocation on questions of deforestation, the increasing impact of wildfires and the destruction of biodiversity, which is also linked to increasing risks of global pandemics and of climate change. Air will be discussed in several vital registers, including both obvious interrelations of pollution and industrial agriculture, such as in the expansion of mono-cropping plantations for agrofuels, but also via the commodification and financialization of land and other natural resources.

The themes may differentiate panels yet the overall aim is to consider critical questions of co-constitution and interdependency.  For instance, a discussion on displacement of rural communities is related to an examination of housing, food and labor exploitation in urban areas. What might begin as a local discussion of labor and land is enmeshed in broader concerns over radical politics of planetary survival and justice.   Thus, fire, water, air, and earth, are not just mnemonic devices but constitute a heuristic for social change.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

The completed application must be submitted no later than 5:00pm on Friday, January 15, 2021. The applications are to be submitted as per the following instructions. Your adviser must submit a letter of recommendation by the same deadline, January 15, 2021.

The application materials should be assembled AS A SINGLE DOCUMENT in pdf or word format in the following order:

a. Application cover sheet

b. Statement of applicability for special focus awards (if applicable, see award descriptions for details)

c. 9-page proposal

d. 1-page bibliography

e. 2-page CV

f. Graduate Center Transcript (unofficial student copy is sufficient)

g. A brief statement (250-300 words) highlighting the linkages of their research with the Center’s ongoing interdisciplinary agenda. One letter of reference to be submitted electronically by your adviser (see instructions page). These materials should not be submitted directly to the CPCP, but to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu. If you have questions, please contact Rachel Sponzo at rsponzo@gc.cuny.edu. One letter of reference to be submitted electronically by your adviser (see instructions page). If you have questions, please contact Rachel Sponzo at rsponzo@gc.cuny.edu.

Instructions for submitting your application:

1. Combine your cover sheet, proposal (including abstract and bibliography), curriculum vitae, and transcript, into a SINGLE file (either as a pdf document or a word document).

• Use the following format when naming your document: Last Name, First Name, Program

2. Email the single application file to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu.

3. Complete the online section of the application through the following form: Graduate Center Dissertation Fellowship Competition

* You must use your Graduate Center email address when you submit both parts of the application. All award notifications will also be sent to your Graduate Center email.

Instructions for Faculty Recommenders

1. Prepare your reference letter as a regular word or pdf document, on letterhead.

• Please use the following format when naming your document: Student Last Name, First Name

2. Email your letter as an attachment to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu.

If you have any questions please contact rsponzo@gc.cuny.edu.

 

APPLICATION INFORMATION FOR FACULTY FELLOWSHIPS 2021-2022

[The 2022-2023 application deadline and theme will be announced by mid-December.]

The deadline for applications is Friday, February 19th, 2021 no later than 12:00pm. Your emailed application must be received on or before this date to be considered. Email faculty fellowships to pcp.gc.cuny.edu.

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics Faculty Fellowship is open to faculty from any discipline whose research articulates with topics that have contemporary urgency, regardless of period or methodological approach. The Center runs a lively weekly seminar in which we discuss fellows’ work-in-progress. We also host distinguished lecture series and other special programming, and sponsor conferences organized around annual themes. Recent yearlong topics have included “Urban Uprisings,” “Mobilizations and Migrations,” “Consciousness and Revolution,” and “The Agrarian Question Today.”

We invite faculty fellow applicants to provide a statement (1500 words) on their research that highlights the linkages of their research with the Center’s ongoing interdisciplinary agenda (see below for complete application instructions and application form). Kindly note: acceptance of the award is contingent on being able to attend the CPCP’s Wednesday morning (10am-noon) seminar during the academic year.

For the purpose of your application, the description of our spring 2021 Conference demonstrates the wide range of our engagement:

Agrarian Questions, Urban Connections, and Planetary Possibilities

Over the last year, the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the CUNY Graduate Center has been exploring historical and current elements of the “Agrarian Question” in different territories of the planet.   The material conditions of agrarian life are deeply connected to the political, social, economic, environmental and cultural challenges of contemporary existence at a planetary scale. Agrarian spaces are central to geopolitical disputes over land and other natural resources, and rural social movements play a key role in defending biodiversity and food production. Moreover, agrarian spaces are linked to urban places through the flows of people, goods, money, information, and waste .  In this context, some questions discussed were, for example, how have regimes of capital, particularly those associated with agribusiness, industrial, financial and trading corporations fractured rural communities transnationally, and how have they been they are able to resist? How have rural social movements internationally sought an exit point from hegemonic modes of agricultural oppression and primitive accumulation? How have rural social movements connected and organized with urban social movements?

This year’s conference events from the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the Graduate Center, CUNY, will build on its discussions of these and other questions using four linked online panels and themes around fire, water, earth, and air.

Around the rubric of water, panelists will address the environmental and social impacts of rising sea levels, corporate -fishing, water pollution, and associated relations between commodity circulation and sea lanes or oceanic cable networks.  The privatization of water and water grabbing   by agribusiness, mining, dams and other predatory corporations are major threats to distribution and access of water as a human right, accentuating  that water is a primary arena of socio-economic contestation.

Similarly, using earth at a global scale, panelists will examine earth as soil, as a biodiverse base of socialization, of food production versus mono-cropping of commodities, or earth in terms of the geo-economics and labor relations of mining (rare earth metals, for instance), or the problem of soil erosion and water pollution through the use of chemical inputs based on fossil fuels, genetically modified seeds, and large irrigation systems in agribusiness plantations, which are a main cause of environmental destruction and climate change.

The theme of fire is a provocation on questions of deforestation, the increasing impact of wildfires and the destruction of biodiversity, which is also linked to increasing risks of global pandemics and of climate change. Air will be discussed in several vital registers, including both obvious interrelations of pollution and industrial agriculture, such as in the expansion of mono-cropping plantations for agrofuels, but also via the commodification and financialization of land and other natural resources.

The themes may differentiate panels yet the overall aim is to consider critical questions of co-constitution and interdependency.  For instance, a discussion on displacement of rural communities is related to an examination of housing, food and labor exploitation in urban areas. What might begin as a local discussion of labor and land is enmeshed in broader concerns over radical politics of planetary survival and justice.   Thus, fire, water, air, and earth, are not just mnemonic devices but constitute a heuristic for social change.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

A completed  Faculty-Fellow-Application is comprised of four parts:

  • Completed faculty application form 2021 that includes the signature of the program Executive Officer for faculty with Graduate School and University Center (GSUC) appointments or of Department chairs for non-GSUC appointments;
  • 150 words abstract;
  • Project description that relates your project to the CPCP’s wide range of interdisciplinary engagement, as demonstrated in the 2021 conference description above (maximum 1500 words);
  • A current short CV (maximum 5 pages).

Submission guidelines:

Submit completed application by e-mail as a PDF attachment (including the signed application form) to pcp@gc.cuny.edu. Title email as: “FACULTY FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION”. The application deadline is Friday, February 19th, 2020 no later than 12:00pm.

Inquiries about the faculty fellowship can be sent to pcp@gc.cuny.edu** 

APPLICATION INFORMATION FOR POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP

 

The CPCP expects to hire a postdoc for 2022-23. Please check back later for more information.