Events

9/22: “We Must Divest From Fossil Fuels”

9/22: “We Must Divest From Fossil Fuels”

09/22/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

We Must Divest From Fossil Fuels

Thursday, September 22

6:30-8:30 pm

Skylight Room

fossil

If we listen to climate scientists like James Hansen, we know that it is imperative that we stop extracting and burning fossil fuels. Yet, as the recent struggles around the Dakota Access Pipeline reveal, big oil companies will stop at nothing in their quest to squeeze every last drop of fossil fuels out of the ground. And they are supported in this destructive quest by big banks and organizations like the World Bank. In response to this extreme extraction, the movement to divest from fossil fuels is pushing institutions – including universities – to kick the fossil fuel habit. What progress have divestment movements in NY-area schools made, and how can CUNY Divest draw on their experiences? What links can we forge between academic institutions and city- and state-level efforts, such as the movement to divest pension funds? This exciting roundtable offers a chance to compare notes and strategize for a future without fossil fuels.

Speakers:

Senator Liz Krueger, New York State Senate

City Council Member Helen B. Rosenthal, New York City Council

President Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, RN, New York State Nurses Association

Mikayla Petchell, Columbia Divest for Climate Justice

Ana Paola White, CUNY Divest

 

 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public.

LECTURE SERIES (updated dates and locations): MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

LECTURE SERIES (updated dates and locations): MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

09/19/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room C201

MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY
A SERIES OF 6 MONDAY EVENING LECTURES IN POLITICAL ECONOMY BY DAVID HARVEY

6:30-8:30 PM

September 12, 19, 26

November 21, 28

December 5

365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016

****Due to overwhelming interest, some locations and dates of these events have been changed. Please note carefully the new locations and dates below****

marxbook

 

SEPTEMBER 12:  CAPITAL AS VALUE IN MOTION

 

SEPTEMBER 19TH: VALUE AND ANTI-VALUE (rooms C201/C202/C203-capacity 120)

 

SEPTEMBER 26TH: VALUE AND ITS MONETARY EXPRESSION (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204-capacity of 160)

 

NOVEMBER 21STTHE SPACE AND TIME OF VALUE (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204 capacity 160)

 

NOVEMBER 28: USE VALUES: THE PRODUCTION OF WANTS, NEEDS AND DESIRES (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204-capacity 160)

 

DECEMBER 5: BAD INFINITY AND THE MADNESS OF ECONOMIC REASON (rooms C201/C202/C203-capacity 120)

 

All lectures in this series will be held from 6:30-8:30 PM  at 365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016.

*Please note carefully the locations for each date and the capacity of the room, as entry is on a first come basis.

**Videos of these lectures will appear on David Harvey’s website and the CPCP website in the coming months.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public. Photo ID is required to enter the building.

 

DAVID HARVEY LECTURE SERIES (updated dates and locations): MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

DAVID HARVEY LECTURE SERIES (updated dates and locations): MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

09/19/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room C201

MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY
A SERIES OF 6 MONDAY EVENING LECTURES IN POLITICAL ECONOMY BY DAVID HARVEY

6:30-8:30 PM

NOVEMBER 21STTHE SPACE AND TIME OF VALUE (Elebash Recital Hall-capacity 189)

NOVEMBER 28: USE VALUES: THE PRODUCTION OF WANTS, NEEDS AND DESIRES (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204-capacity 160)

DECEMBER 5: BAD INFINITY AND THE MADNESS OF ECONOMIC REASON (rooms C201/C202/C203-capacity 120)

365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016

****Due to overwhelming interest, some locations and dates of these events have been changed. Please note carefully the new locations and dates below****

marxbook

 

All lectures in this series will be held from 6:30-8:30 PM  at 365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016.

*Please note carefully the locations for each date and the capacity of the room, as entry is on a first come basis.

**Videos of the first three lectures have been posted on David Harvey’s website and the CPCP website, and the upcoming lectures will be posted in their aftermath in the coming months.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public. Photo ID is required to enter the building.

 

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

05/13/2016
All Day
Elebash Recital Hall

The complex and dynamic relationship between consciousness and revolution is essential to the strategic analysis of the hegemonic forms of politics, economics, thought, and action we are currently caught in. It is also central to the collective imagination and realization of other worlds. This conference reflects on legacies of revolutionary thought and practice and considers how these can be reimagined and reenergized within current contingencies.

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

05/13/2016
All Day
Elebash Recital Hall

The complex and dynamic relationship between consciousness and revolution is essential to the strategic analysis of the hegemonic forms of politics, economics, thought, and action we are currently caught in. It is also central to the collective imagination and realization of other worlds. This conference reflects on legacies of revolutionary thought and practice and considers how these can be reimagined and reenergized within current contingencies.

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

05/13/2016
All Day
Elebash Recital Hall

The complex and dynamic relationship between consciousness and revolution is essential to the strategic analysis of the hegemonic forms of politics, economics, thought, and action we are currently caught in. It is also central to the collective imagination and realization of other worlds. This conference reflects on legacies of revolutionary thought and practice and considers how these can be reimagined and reenergized within current contingencies.

Oral History and Counter-Mapping as Methods towards Anti-Gentrification and Anti-Displacement

Oral History and Counter-Mapping as Methods towards Anti-Gentrification and Anti-Displacement

04/13/2016
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

Oral History and Counter-Mapping as Methods towards Anti-Gentrification and Anti-Displacement: A Conversation with the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project and Brooklyn Laundry Social Club

Wednesday April 13, 2016

6-8PM

Room 6112, Sociology lounge

 
How can methods of storytelling, oral history and mapping work together to counter gentrification and displacement and bolster social movements- or not? What does this work do? In this event Manissa Maharawal from the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project and Mary Taylor from Brooklyn Laundry Social Club will think about how narrative and mapping based methods of co-research can (or cannot) change and effect processes of displacement, gentrification and eviction. We imagine this event as a conversation about co-research and movement building with presenters and the audience.
The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project:

In San Francisco, cranes litter the horizon, neighborhoods have quickly become more expensive, longtime residents are rapidly displaced and the city has gained international attention for skyrocketing rents, and exponentially growing income inequality. The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project’s “Narratives of Displacement and Resistance Oral History Project” aims to document these changes in San Francisco by foregrounding the stories of people who have been, who are being, or who were being, displaced. Through collecting oral histories the project creates a living archive of people and places, documenting deep and detailed neighborhood and personal histories. In doing so the project creates a counter-narrative to more dominant archives that elide detail and attention to legacy, culture, and loss in the city. Our map lives online to be interacted with by the public, but also offline in physical spaces including our current zine project and our narrative mural in Clarion Alley. While we are interested in stories of dispossession, we are not interested in reducing people to their evictions, and thus instead focus on the intimacies of personal relationships to shifts in spatiality as processes of gentrification unevenly unfold. We recognize that displacement transpires in kaleidoscopic forms, and that loss is corporeal, cultural, haunting, and real. In this talk Manissa Maharawal the co-director of the Narratives of Displacement Project will discuss how the project was formulated, evolved and changed and the ways in which the project uses practices of radical mapping to engage the public.

Narratives of Displacement1 Narratives of Displacement.jpeg

Brooklyn Laundry Social Club: 

In 2012 Brooklyn Laundry Social Club (BLSC) set out to organize events in laundromats in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, to address topics of local concern, especially changes in the neighborhood related to rising property values, foreclosure, and displacement. Envisioning ourselves as a mobile community center, we wanted our events and methods to emerge from concerns, desires and skills of neighbors.  Our goal was to transform the nascent community in laundromats into an active one by engaging in collective projects that build neighborly relationships, embodied sympathy, and critical alliance. We believe that making things together and doing research as equals can produce new dynamics and knowledge.  Along with interviews, oral histories and blogging, our mapping game has been a key method of research and collaboration. It is our hope that the knowledge we co-produce will contribute to our collective ability to direct the future of the neighborhood.

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This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public.

 

Book Event: The Incomplete, True, Authentic, and Wonderful History of May Day

Book Event: The Incomplete, True, Authentic, and Wonderful History of May Day

03/31/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Anthropology Lounge

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Anthropology Lounge.

Linebaugh - May Day book

About the book:

“May Day is about affirmation, the love of life, and the start of spring, so it has to be about the beginning of the end of the capitalist system of exploitation, oppression, war, and overall misery, toil, and moil.” So writes celebrated historian Peter Linebaugh in an essential compendium of reflections on the reviled, glorious, and voltaic occasion of May 1st.

It is a day that has made the rich and powerful cower in fear and caused Parliament to ban the Maypole—a magnificent and riotous day of rebirth, renewal, and refusal. These reflections on the Red and the Green—out of which arguably the only hope for the future lies—are populated by the likes of Native American anarcho-communist Lucy Parsons, the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement, Karl Marx, José Martí, W.E.B. Du Bois, Rosa Luxemburg, SNCC, and countless others, both sentient and verdant. The book is a forceful reminder of the potentialities of the future, for the coming of a time when the powerful will fall, the commons restored, and a better world born anew.

Peter Linebaugh is a child of empire, schooled in London, Cattaraugus, N.Y., Washington D.C., Bonn, and Karachi. He went to Swarthmore College during the civil rights days. He has taught at Harvard University and Attica Penitentiary, at New York University and the Federal Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois. He used to edit Zerowork and was a member of the Midnight Notes Collective. He coauthored Albion’s Fatal Tree, and is the author of The London Hanged, The Many-Headed Hydra (with Marcus Rediker), The Magna Carta Manifesto, and introductions to a Verso book of Thomas Paine’s writing and PM’s new edition of E.P. Thompson’s William Morris: Romantic to Revolutionary. He works at the University of Toledo, Ohio. He lives in the Great Lakes region with a great crew, Michaela Brennan, his beautiful partner, and Riley, Kate, Alex, and Enzo.

The Trials of the Spring screening and Quandaries of Documentation in Egypt?

03/30/2016
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

The film screening with the attendance of the director Gini Reticker  and activist Hend Nafea; will be followed by two short presentations by Nada El-Kouny and Ola Galal about the current political situation in Egypt, the quandaries of documentation, and the dilemma of doing research. Moderated by Omnia Khalil

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

6:00 – 9:00 pm

Martin Segal Theater

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The Trials of Spring feature documentary recounts the story of 21-year-old Hend Nafea who travels from her village to Cairo in the early days of the Arab Spring in search of freedom and justice. As the country becomes gripped in a dangerous power struggle she endures crushing setbacks. In the end, Hend’s resilience sustains the hope of reform for her and her fellow activists, even during the darkest hours of their struggle for a better Egypt.

Gini Reticker has been directing and producing award-winning independent documentary films for over 20 years.  Reticker directed Pray the Devil Back to Hell (2008), the inspiring story of Liberian women whose actions helped bring an end to a brutal civil war—it premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival where it won Best Documentary. She produced the Academy Award-nominated short Asylum(2003) the story of a Ghanaian woman who fled female genital mutilation to seek political asylum in the U.S; that same year she produced A Decade Under the Influence that looks at the heyday of 1970s filmmakers, was nominated for an Emmy, and garnered the National Review Board Award for Best Documentary. She received an Emmy for Ladies First (2004), the story of women rebuilding post-genocide Rwanda.  Her first film The Heart of the Matter (1994) a groundbreaking film about women and AIDS, won the Sundance Freedom of Expression Award. She was a creator and executive producer of the PBS series Women, War & Peace (2011), recipient of the Overseas Press Club’s Edward R. Murrow Award as well as The Academy of Television Honors Award. Reticker has also coproduced or executive produced such notable films as The Betrayal (Nerakhoon)— nominated for both an Academy Award and an Independent Spirit Award; 1971, Alias Ruby Blade, Citizen Koch, Hot Girls Wanted, and She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry.

Hend Nafea  received a degree in Mathematics Curricula and Teaching Method from Banha University in Egypt. While still a student, she joined thousands of Egyptians demonstrating for an end to 60 years of military rule. At the demonstration, she was arrested, beaten, and tortured by security forces and subsequently faced numerous charges, including attempting to overthrow the state. Her family punished her severely and tried to prevent her from any further participation in the public sphere. She later refused their attempts to marry her off to someone she didn’t know and headed to Cairo alone where she found work at the Hisham Mubarak Law Center.  As the state’s case against her wound its way through the courts, Nafea started the organization Nation Without Torture to support fellow victims of torture at the hands of Egyptian security forces. In February 2015 she, along with 229 of her codefendants, was sentenced in absentia to life in prison. She managed to leave Egypt and now lives in exile pursuing justice for all Egyptians.

Nada El-Kouny is a PhD candidate at Rutgers University in Anthropology. Her work focuses on infrastructure, violence, and state (un)making in rural Egypt. Nada previously worked as a journalist for Ahram Online in Cairo from 2011-2013. Nada is also involved in a number of documentary film projects.

Ola Galal is a PhD student at the Graduate Center, CUNY in cultural anthropology. Her research focuses on youth, marginalization, and political participation in Egypt and Tunisia. Previously, she worked as a journalist covering current events and economic news in North Africa and the Middle East for Bloomberg, Thomson Reuters, and Agence France-Presse.

Omnia Khalil is a PhD student at CUNY Graduate Center, cultural anthropology program. Omnia is an urban researcher and co-founder of 10 Tooba| Applied Research on the Built Environment. Her research focuses on social urban justice, informality, and violence in times of revolutions, in the self-built housing areas and urban poor, and the gentrification processes.

 

This event is free and open tot he public. It is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY.

Sexual Violence against Women in Egypt: Prevalence in the Public Sphere, Interventions and Support Provided

Sexual Violence against Women in Egypt: Prevalence in the Public Sphere, Interventions and Support Provided

03/14/2016
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

Monday, March 14th, 2016

6:00 – 8:00 pm

Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

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Violence against Women in Egypt is a crime that is committed and has been committed for many decades. However, mobilization on combating these crimes has increased in the past 5 years, where discourse on this issue has transformed from being a taboo to an issue of public opinion. Feminist groups and organizations have been providing several intervention mechanisms for these crimes, including the provision of support services for survivors of these crimes, such as the provision of legal, psychological and medical support, in addition to pressuring the state to make interventions to eradicate these crimes and hold perpetrators accountable. Despite the issuance of a national strategy to combat violence against women in May 2015, these crimes still run rampant and state interventions lack an institutional holistic approach in tackling them. The concerned panel, conducted by Nazra for Feminist Studies, will shed light on the intervention mechanisms employed to combat these crimes, challenges faced and vision in ensuring that a holistic approach is enacted.

 

Speakers:

Mozn Hassan is the founder and Executive Director of Nazra for Feminist Studies (www.nazra.org) since December 2007. Nazra is a youth initiative to integrate gender and feminism in the Egyptian society Her research interests range from combating violence against women, to history of feminism in Egypt, to early child marriage. She has an MA from the American University in Cairo with a thesis on “Legal Interpretations to the Right to Divorce and Polygamy and the Egyptian Feminist Movement”. Ms. Hassan serves as Egypt advisor with the Global Fund for Women and as UNDP project formulation consultant with the project “Combating Female Genital Mutilation”. She is also a consultant with African Women’s Development and Communication Network- FEMNET in a study of Promoting African Women’s Economic Empowerment through Gender Responsive Trade Agreement. She is also a member of the Regional Experts’ Committee of the Regional Coalition for Women Human Rights Defenders in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Her forthcoming published articles include Islamic interpretations for women’s issues and the availability to create Islamic feminism movement, Muslim brotherhood case study” Democracy Review and a research on Early Child Marriage with Women Living Under Muslim Laws- Africa and Middle East Office. Ms. Hassan received the inaugural Charlotte Bunch Human Rights Defender Award on April 17th, 2013 at the Global Fund for Women’s 25th Anniversary Gala.

Amal Elmohandes  works as the Director of the Women Human Rights Defenders (WHRD) Program at Nazra for Feminist Studies, a program which provides legal, psychological and medical support to WHRDs in Egypt, in addition to focusing on knowledge production related to WHRDs. Amal has engaged in the issue of sexual violence in the Egyptian public sphere, due to it being one of the main issues that Nazra works on. She is also a member of the Emergency and Urgent Responses Committee of the Regional Coalition for Women Human Rights Defenders in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Amal obtained a Bachelor Degree in Arts from the American University in Cairo, where she majored in English and Comparative Literature, and a M.Phil. in Gender and Women’s Studies from Trinity College Dublin. Before joining Nazra, she worked at the Bi-National Fulbright Commission in Egypt under the Community College Initiative.

 

This event is free and open tot he public. It is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY.

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