Events

10/27: “Beyond the Square” and “Zoned Out!”: New books on urban politics from Urban Research press

10/27: “Beyond the Square” and “Zoned Out!”: New books on urban politics from Urban Research press

10/27/2016
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
4102

 

October 27, 2016

5:30 – 7:00 pm

Science Center, Room 4102

Speakers:

Tom Angotti (Hunter College, Urban Policy and Planning), Sylvia Morse (urban planner), Deen Sharp (doctoral candidate, EES) & Claire Panetta (doctoral candidate, Anthropology),

Moderated by Samuel Stein (graduate student, EES)

Books:

angotti

Zoned Out! Race, Displacement and City Planning in New York City (Urban Research, 2016)

Gentrification and displacement of low-income communities of color are major issues in New York City and the city’s zoning policies are a major cause. Race matters but the city ignores it when shaping land use and housing policies. The city promises “affordable housing” that is not truly affordable. Zoned Out! shows how this has played in Williamsburg, Harlem and Chinatown, neighborhoods facing massive displacement of people of color. It looks at ways the city can address inequalities, promote authentic community-based planning and develop housing in the public domain.

beyondsquare

Beyond the Square: Urbanism and the Arab Uprisings (Urban Research, 2016.)

Urbanism and the Arab Uprisings focuses on the urban spatial dynamics of the mass protest movements that convulsed the Arab region since December 2010. The volume shifts attention away from public squares — and in particular Tahrir Square in Cairo — to consider the broader urban context in which the uprisings unfolded. The essays are topically and geographically diverse, exploring a range of sociospatial phenomena in countries that are at the heart of the Arab uprisings as well as those countries that appeared peripheral to the upheaval. This breadth of perspective highlights the centrality of space and spatial concerns to the ongoing political transformations in the region. In this way, the book provides a distinctive — and critical — analysis of one of the most significant political events of our time.

 

This event is sponsored by the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program and the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.

9/28:  Hard Sell: Work and Resistance in Retail Chains

9/28: Hard Sell: Work and Resistance in Retail Chains

09/28/2016
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Room 6112

Book event: Hard Sell: Work and Resistance in Retail Chains (ILR/Cornell University Press, 2016) by Peter Ikeler

September 28th, 2016 6-9 pm, Sociology Lounge (room 6112)

Speakers:

  • Ruth Milkman, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, CUNY Graduate Center
  • Gerald Sider, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, CUNY Graduate Center
  • Peter Ikeler, Assistant Professor of Sociology, SUNY College at Old Westbury (book author)

hard-sell-cover

About the book:

Along with fast-food workers, retail workers are capturing the attention of the public and the media with the Fight for $15. Like fast-food workers, retail workers are underpaid, and fewer than 5 percent of them belong to unions. In Hard Sell, Peter Ikeler traces the low-wage, largely nonunion character of U.S. retail through the history and ultimate failure of twentieth-century retail unionism. He asks pivotal questions about twenty-first-century capitalism: Does the nature of retail work make collective action unlikely? Can working conditions improve in the absence of a union? Is worker consciousness changing in ways that might encourage or further inhibit organizing? Ikeler conducted interviews at New York City locations of two iconic department stores—Macy’s and Target. Much of the book’s narrative unfolds from the perspectives of these workers in America’s most unequal city.

When he speaks to workers, Ikeler finds that the Macy’s organization displays an adversarial relationship between workers and managers and that Target is infused with a “teamwork” message that enfolds both parties. Macy’s workers identify more with their jobs and are more opposed to management, yet Target workers show greater solidarity. Both groups, however, are largely unhappy with the pay and precariousness of their jobs. Combined with workplace-generated feelings of unity and resistance, these grievances provide promising inroads to organizing that could help take the struggle against inequality beyond symbolic action to real economic power.

Author bio:

Born near Lowell Massachusetts, Ikeler grew up with the remains of former industry and class struggles all around him, which helped shape his worldview on issues of class and workers’ rights.  He is now a Brooklyn-based activist and Assistant Professor of Sociology at SUNY College at Old Westbury. He earned his Ph.D. in Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center, his M.A. in European Culture and Economy at the Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany and his B.A. in Philosophy from New York University. His ongoing research examines the constraints and potential of what might be termed the postindustrial working class in advanced capitalist societies.

 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public.

9/26: Ethnography Inside Out: Activism and Research among Urban Social Movements in the United States by Ahmed Kanna

9/26: Ethnography Inside Out: Activism and Research among Urban Social Movements in the United States by Ahmed Kanna

09/26/2016
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Room 6107

Ethnography Inside Out: Activism and Research among Urban Social Movements in the United States by Ahmed Kanna

September 26th, 2016

14:30-16:30

Room 6107 (space is limited to 20)

CUNY Graduate Center 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016

 

In this informal roundtable, Ahmed Kanna will explore his latest research among Bay Area radical socialists organizing around issues of urban politics, workers’ rights and empowerment, antiracism, and LGBTQ solidarity. More specifically, he will discuss how youth activists are getting radicalized to the left in the US, how this relates to US wars/foreign policy, and how becoming active in Marxist political organizing connects them to internationalism/international political issues. Of particular concern is the question of how to reconcile being both an organizer with an activist group and a scholar studying the group’s work ethnographically.

Author bio: 

Ahmed Kanna is an associate professor at the University of the Pacific and the author of Dubai, The City as Corporation. kanna0

 

 

 

 

 

 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public.

 

9/22: “We Must Divest From Fossil Fuels”

9/22: “We Must Divest From Fossil Fuels”

09/22/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

We Must Divest From Fossil Fuels

Thursday, September 22

6:30-8:30 pm

Skylight Room

fossil

If we listen to climate scientists like James Hansen, we know that it is imperative that we stop extracting and burning fossil fuels. Yet, as the recent struggles around the Dakota Access Pipeline reveal, big oil companies will stop at nothing in their quest to squeeze every last drop of fossil fuels out of the ground. And they are supported in this destructive quest by big banks and organizations like the World Bank. In response to this extreme extraction, the movement to divest from fossil fuels is pushing institutions – including universities – to kick the fossil fuel habit. What progress have divestment movements in NY-area schools made, and how can CUNY Divest draw on their experiences? What links can we forge between academic institutions and city- and state-level efforts, such as the movement to divest pension funds? This exciting roundtable offers a chance to compare notes and strategize for a future without fossil fuels.

Speakers:

Senator Liz Krueger, New York State Senate

City Council Member Helen B. Rosenthal, New York City Council

President Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, RN, New York State Nurses Association

Mikayla Petchell, Columbia Divest for Climate Justice

Ana Paola White, CUNY Divest

 

 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public.

9/19: MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

9/19: MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

09/19/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room C201

MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY
A SERIES OF 6 MONDAY EVENING LECTURES IN POLITICAL ECONOMY BY DAVID HARVEY

6:30-8:30 PM

September 12, 19, 26

November 21, 28

December 5

365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016

****Due to overwhelming interest, some locations and dates of these events have been changed. Please note carefully the new locations and dates below****

marxbook

 

SEPTEMBER 12:  CAPITAL AS VALUE IN MOTION

 

SEPTEMBER 19TH: VALUE AND ANTI-VALUE (rooms C201/C202/C203-capacity 120)

 

SEPTEMBER 26TH: VALUE AND ITS MONETARY EXPRESSION (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204-capacity of 160)

 

NOVEMBER 21STTHE SPACE AND TIME OF VALUE (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204 (adjoined to Rooms-capacity 160)

 

NOVEMBER 28: USE VALUES: THE PRODUCTION OF WANTS, NEEDS AND DESIRES (rooms C201/C202/C203/C204-capacity 160)

 

DECEMBER 5: BAD INFINITY AND THE MADNESS OF ECONOMIC REASON (rooms C201/C202/C203-capacity 120)

 

All lectures in this series will be held from 6:30-8:30 PM  at 365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016.

*Please note carefully the locations for each date and the capacity of the room, as entry is on a first come basis.

**Videos of these lectures will appear on David Harvey’s website and the CPCP website in the coming months.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public. Photo ID is required to enter the building.

 

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

05/13/2016
All Day
Elebash Recital Hall

The complex and dynamic relationship between consciousness and revolution is essential to the strategic analysis of the hegemonic forms of politics, economics, thought, and action we are currently caught in. It is also central to the collective imagination and realization of other worlds. This conference reflects on legacies of revolutionary thought and practice and considers how these can be reimagined and reenergized within current contingencies.

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

05/13/2016
All Day
Elebash Recital Hall

The complex and dynamic relationship between consciousness and revolution is essential to the strategic analysis of the hegemonic forms of politics, economics, thought, and action we are currently caught in. It is also central to the collective imagination and realization of other worlds. This conference reflects on legacies of revolutionary thought and practice and considers how these can be reimagined and reenergized within current contingencies.

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLUTION Conference | Friday May 13th, 2016

05/13/2016
All Day
Elebash Recital Hall

The complex and dynamic relationship between consciousness and revolution is essential to the strategic analysis of the hegemonic forms of politics, economics, thought, and action we are currently caught in. It is also central to the collective imagination and realization of other worlds. This conference reflects on legacies of revolutionary thought and practice and considers how these can be reimagined and reenergized within current contingencies.

Oral History and Counter-Mapping as Methods towards Anti-Gentrification and Anti-Displacement

Oral History and Counter-Mapping as Methods towards Anti-Gentrification and Anti-Displacement

04/13/2016
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

Oral History and Counter-Mapping as Methods towards Anti-Gentrification and Anti-Displacement: A Conversation with the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project and Brooklyn Laundry Social Club

Wednesday April 13, 2016

6-8PM

Room 6112, Sociology lounge

 
How can methods of storytelling, oral history and mapping work together to counter gentrification and displacement and bolster social movements- or not? What does this work do? In this event Manissa Maharawal from the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project and Mary Taylor from Brooklyn Laundry Social Club will think about how narrative and mapping based methods of co-research can (or cannot) change and effect processes of displacement, gentrification and eviction. We imagine this event as a conversation about co-research and movement building with presenters and the audience.
The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project:

In San Francisco, cranes litter the horizon, neighborhoods have quickly become more expensive, longtime residents are rapidly displaced and the city has gained international attention for skyrocketing rents, and exponentially growing income inequality. The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project’s “Narratives of Displacement and Resistance Oral History Project” aims to document these changes in San Francisco by foregrounding the stories of people who have been, who are being, or who were being, displaced. Through collecting oral histories the project creates a living archive of people and places, documenting deep and detailed neighborhood and personal histories. In doing so the project creates a counter-narrative to more dominant archives that elide detail and attention to legacy, culture, and loss in the city. Our map lives online to be interacted with by the public, but also offline in physical spaces including our current zine project and our narrative mural in Clarion Alley. While we are interested in stories of dispossession, we are not interested in reducing people to their evictions, and thus instead focus on the intimacies of personal relationships to shifts in spatiality as processes of gentrification unevenly unfold. We recognize that displacement transpires in kaleidoscopic forms, and that loss is corporeal, cultural, haunting, and real. In this talk Manissa Maharawal the co-director of the Narratives of Displacement Project will discuss how the project was formulated, evolved and changed and the ways in which the project uses practices of radical mapping to engage the public.

Narratives of Displacement1 Narratives of Displacement.jpeg

Brooklyn Laundry Social Club: 

In 2012 Brooklyn Laundry Social Club (BLSC) set out to organize events in laundromats in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, to address topics of local concern, especially changes in the neighborhood related to rising property values, foreclosure, and displacement. Envisioning ourselves as a mobile community center, we wanted our events and methods to emerge from concerns, desires and skills of neighbors.  Our goal was to transform the nascent community in laundromats into an active one by engaging in collective projects that build neighborly relationships, embodied sympathy, and critical alliance. We believe that making things together and doing research as equals can produce new dynamics and knowledge.  Along with interviews, oral histories and blogging, our mapping game has been a key method of research and collaboration. It is our hope that the knowledge we co-produce will contribute to our collective ability to direct the future of the neighborhood.

TAMA Summerfest II Aug 4 043sarahartst

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public.

 

Book Event: The Incomplete, True, Authentic, and Wonderful History of May Day

Book Event: The Incomplete, True, Authentic, and Wonderful History of May Day

03/31/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Anthropology Lounge

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Anthropology Lounge.

Linebaugh - May Day book

About the book:

“May Day is about affirmation, the love of life, and the start of spring, so it has to be about the beginning of the end of the capitalist system of exploitation, oppression, war, and overall misery, toil, and moil.” So writes celebrated historian Peter Linebaugh in an essential compendium of reflections on the reviled, glorious, and voltaic occasion of May 1st.

It is a day that has made the rich and powerful cower in fear and caused Parliament to ban the Maypole—a magnificent and riotous day of rebirth, renewal, and refusal. These reflections on the Red and the Green—out of which arguably the only hope for the future lies—are populated by the likes of Native American anarcho-communist Lucy Parsons, the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement, Karl Marx, José Martí, W.E.B. Du Bois, Rosa Luxemburg, SNCC, and countless others, both sentient and verdant. The book is a forceful reminder of the potentialities of the future, for the coming of a time when the powerful will fall, the commons restored, and a better world born anew.

Peter Linebaugh is a child of empire, schooled in London, Cattaraugus, N.Y., Washington D.C., Bonn, and Karachi. He went to Swarthmore College during the civil rights days. He has taught at Harvard University and Attica Penitentiary, at New York University and the Federal Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois. He used to edit Zerowork and was a member of the Midnight Notes Collective. He coauthored Albion’s Fatal Tree, and is the author of The London Hanged, The Many-Headed Hydra (with Marcus Rediker), The Magna Carta Manifesto, and introductions to a Verso book of Thomas Paine’s writing and PM’s new edition of E.P. Thompson’s William Morris: Romantic to Revolutionary. He works at the University of Toledo, Ohio. He lives in the Great Lakes region with a great crew, Michaela Brennan, his beautiful partner, and Riley, Kate, Alex, and Enzo.

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