Events

4/13 & 4/14: CPCP Spring Conference: “Insurgent Solidarities”

4/13 & 4/14: CPCP Spring Conference: “Insurgent Solidarities”

04/13/2018 - 04/14/2018
12:00 am
CUNY Graduate Center

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics Presents its annual conference:

Insurgent Solidarities 

–histories, formations, futures—

 

Friday, April 13 and Saturday April 14, 2018

Given the political challenges of the present, the necessity for a deeper understanding of radical solidarity appears more pressing than ever. Yet while solidarity has been pivotal to social change since at least the Haitian Revolution, how it is articulated has never been less than problematic. Is it a process of political change? Is it its goal? How does solidarity define what it is against without excluding forms of political difference that might enhance it? What can be learned from solidarity in the past, especially when contingent solidarity in the present regards such a history with justifiable incredulity? There can be no doubt that notions of solidarity continue to impact creatively how one understands political opposition and change, how one interrogates constituency and allies, goals and timelines. The differences of solidarity and a respect for the specificity of particular struggles clearly invigorates how solidarity is now engaged, but solidarity can also be more than negotiated coalitions and fragmented alliances. The CPCP seminar 2018-2019 encourages applications on the theme of “insurgent solidarities.” What makes solidarity insurgent? Is it its composition or the kind of change it struggles to affect? What are its political and cultural scales and modes, and what are their significance today? In what ways is solidarity not just an object of knowledge, but actively produces it?

Sponsored by the Center for Place Culture and Politics; the Center for Humanities, the Advanced Research Collaborative, and the Department of Anthropology, Graduate Center, CUNY. This conference is free and open to the public.

More information will follow.

Please check pcp.gc.cuny.edu for updates.

 

02/15: Financial Markets and Land Speculation

02/15: Financial Markets and Land Speculation

02/15/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

Please join the Center for Place, Culture and Politics for Financial Markets and Land Speculation, the public facing event of the 2nd International Seminar “Pension Funds, Financial Markets and Land Speculation”:

Financial Markets and Land Speculation 

Thursday, February 15 

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Segal Theater, Ground Floor, CUNY Graduate Center

The Seminar is part of an international campaign focusing on the role of the pension fund TIAA and includes social movements and scholars from Brazil, Canada, Germany and the United States looking at financial markets, land and food systems.

Financialization is leading to new forms of land grabbing, with heavy involvement by pension funds and other financial corporations that began targeting farmland around the world after the emergence of the financial crisis in 2007-2008.

Rural communities in the Global North and in the Global South, as well as workers in the Global North whose pensions are invested in land grabbing, are both impacted and can work together to stop this trend.

The event follows the 1st International Seminar on Land Grabbing, hosted and sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics in November of 2015, with the launching of the report “Foreign pension funds and land grabbing in Brazil”, available in Portuguese, English and French:

http://www.social.org.br/index.php/pub/cartilhas-portugues/188-a-empresa-radar-s-a-e-a-especulacao-com-terras-no-brasil.html[social.org.br]

https://www.grain.org/article/entries/5336-foreign-pension-funds-and-land-grabbing-in-brazil[grain.org]

https://www.grain.org/article/entries/5337-fonds-de-pension-etrangers-et-accaparement-des-terres-au-bresil[grain.org]

 

SPEAKERS:

Maria Luisa Mendonça (Moderator) – Visiting Scholar, Center for Place, Culture and Politics, CUNY Graduate Center

Fabio Pitta – Rede Social de Justiça e Direitos Humanos (Network for Social Justice and Human Rights, Brazil)

Isolete Wichinieski – Comissão Pastoral da Terra (Pastoral Land Commission, Brazil)

Devlin Kuyek – GRAIN (Canada)

David Harvey – Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography and Director of Research, Center for Place, Culture and Politics, CUNY Graduate Center

To view the LIVESTREAM of this event: Go to videostreaming.gc.cuny.edu  and click on the link in the “Live Videos” box on the upper right hand side of the page. Click on this event.

Co-Sponsored by:

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics – CUNY Graduate Center

ActionAid USA

Comissão Pastoral da Terra (Pastoral Land Commission, Brazil)

FIAN International

Friends of the Earth, U.S.

GRAIN

Grassroots International (US)

Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

National Family Farm Coalition (US)

Presbyterian Hunger Program – PC(USA)

Rede Social de Justiça e Direitos Humanos (Network for Social Justice and Human Rights, Brazil)

WhyHunger (US)

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

02/09 (& 02/28, 03/14, 03/30): CPCP FILM SERIES: “The Militant Image” and the struggles against colonialism

02/09 (& 02/28, 03/14, 03/30): CPCP FILM SERIES: “The Militant Image” and the struggles against colonialism

02/09/2018 - 03/30/2018
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

CPCP FILM SERIES

“The Militant Image” and the struggles against colonialism

 2/9; 2/28; 3/14; and 3/30 6:30-8:30pm SEGAL THEATER

“The militant image comprises any form of image or sound – from essay film to fiction feature, from observational documentary to found-footage ciné-pamphlet, from newsreel to agitational reworking of colonial film production – produced in through film-making practices dedicated to the liberation struggles and revolutions of the late twentieth century”. Departing from the liberation struggle against Portuguese colonial power in Guinea Bissau, this film series explores how the liberation struggles are portrayed through cinematic images. How has recovery of liberation texts, memories and images and their use by filmmakers contributed to the understanding of these revolutionary and liberatory movements.

 

2/9 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

The Two Faces of the War (Diana Andringa and Flora Gomes, 2007, 100 minutes)

This documentary shot in Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, and Portugal includes a series of interviews with and testimonies of people who lived through the period of the anticolonial war and liberation struggle in Guinea Bissau. This film sets the tone for a debate around the themes of reconciliation and historical memory in the post-conflict period of the Portuguese “colonial war” and independence struggle.

2/28 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

Mined Soil (Filipa César, 2014, 34 minutes) and The Return of Cabral (Sana N’Hada, Flora Gomes and Josefina Crato, 1976, 31 minutes)

Mined Soil revisits the work of the Guinean Agronomist Amílcar Cabral, from studying the erosion of soil in the Portuguese Alentejo region in the 1950’s through his engagement as one of the leaders of the African liberation movements. This line of inquiry intertwines with documentation of a gold mining site, operated today by a Canadian company located in the same Portuguese area once studied by Cabral.

During the independence struggle, Amílcar Cabral, co-founder of the African party for the Independence of Guinea Bissau and Cape Verde (PAIGC) was killed in 1973. The Return of Cabral documents the relocation of Cabral’s remains, which had been buried in Guinea Conakry, to Guinea Bissau to Guinea Bissau 3 years after independence was proclaimed by the PAIGC.

3/14 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

Spell Reel (Filipa César, 2016, 100 minutes)

This film is a collaborative reflection on West African political history, and the role of moving images in the creation and legacy of that history. Filmmakers Sana Na N’Hada, Flora Gomes, José Bolama Cobumba, and Josefina Crato, who studied filmmaking in Cuba at the directive of Amílcar Cabral, documented Guinea-Bissau’s independence struggle and the subsequent years of socialist rule. In 1979, Chris Marker spent several months with them, and would later integrate carnival footage shot by N’Hada into Sans Soleil. Following the 1980 military coup, many of the revolutionary films were lost; those that remained were little known and at risk of disappearing. 

 To bring these films, and often just fragments of them, back into the public eye, César has worked closely with Arsenal Institute for Film and Video Art in its initiative to preserve the history of revolutionary cinema in Guinea-Bissau through research, digitization, and dissemination of the holdings at the National Film Institute of Guinea-Bissau (INCA – Instituto Nacional de Cinema e Audiovisual).

3/30 6:30p – 8.30p – Segal Theater:

Discussion on the Militant Image, with Sonia Vaz Borges and special guest

The final event, a few short films or fragments (TBA) will be shown, and we will discuss the use of the militant image in make history relevant to the present. 

THIS SERIES IS SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS. IT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

01/09: A Dialogue on White Supremacy with Roxane Dunbar Ortiz and Ramona Africa

01/09: A Dialogue on White Supremacy with Roxane Dunbar Ortiz and Ramona Africa

01/09/2018
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Elebash Recital Hall

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics and The Campaign to Bring Mumia Home invite you to:

A Dialogue on White Supremacy with Roxane Dunbar Ortiz and Ramona Africa

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

6:00-9:00 PM

Elebash Recital Hall

CUNY Graduate Center

365 5th Ave, NY, NY 10016

A book sale for Prof. Dunbar Ortiz’s new monograph, Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment, will follow the event in Room 6107.

Ramona Africa has been a member of the MOVE organization since 1979. She was in her home on May 13, 1985 when the Philadelphia Police Department dropped a military grade bomb on her and her family’s house. The bombing killed 11 men, women, and children. In addition, the bombing destroyed one of the most vibrant Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia: 65 homes were completely burned to the ground.

Ramona was the only adult survivor along with a young boy.

Following the bombing, Ramona was charged with riot and served 7 years in prison. Since her release from prison she has traveled the world telling her story and promoting the MOVE organization.

Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, child of landless farmers.  As a veteran of the 1960s revolution, she has been involved in anti-racist, anti-colonial, anti-imperialist movements, union organizing, and was one of the founders of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the late 1960s.  Since 1973, she has focused on Native American and Ethnic Studies and worked with Indigenous communities for sovereignty and land rights and helped build the international Indigenous movement.  A historian, writer, and professor emeritus in Native American Studies at California State University, she is author of numberous Indigenous related books and articles, including An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Her most recent book is Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment.

 

 

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

THIS EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS AND THE CAMPAIGN TO BRING MUMIA HOME.

 

12/05:”A Conversation about the Cultural Representation of Labor” with Sonali Perera and Peter Hitchcock

12/05:”A Conversation about the Cultural Representation of Labor” with Sonali Perera and Peter Hitchcock

12/05/2017
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
The Graduate Center, CUNY

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics and the Postcolonial Studies Group (Graduate Center) present:

“A Conversation about the Cultural Representation of Labor”

with Sonali Perera, Hunter College, author of No Country: Working-Class Writing in the Age of Globalization (Columbia, 2014)

and

Peter Hitchcock, GC and Baruch College, author of Labor in Culture; or, Worker of the World(s) (Palgrave, 2017)

 Moderated by Shoumik Bhattacharya

 

Tuesday December 5th:

6.30pm

Room 6112  

The Graduate Center, CUNY

365 5th ave, NY, NY, 10002

 

Books will be available for purchase

 

THIS IS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

THIS EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE, AND POLITICS AND THE POST COLONIAL STUDIES GROUP  (GRADUATE CENTER).

11/15: From Socialist Finance to Peripheral Financialization: The Yugoslav Experience

11/15: From Socialist Finance to Peripheral Financialization: The Yugoslav Experience

11/15/2017
6:15 pm - 8:15 pm
The Graduate Center CUNY

From Socialist Finance to Peripheral Financialization: The Yugoslav Experience. Johanna Bockman and Fabio Mattioli in conversation

Wednesday, November 15 2017

6:15-8:15pm

Room 6112

The Graduate Center, CUNY

365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Socialist countries have always had banks: central banks, savings banks taking local deposits, commercial banks, and export banks. Che Guevara was even the director of the National Bank of Cuba. What makes socialist banks “socialist”? And what are the relationships between socialist and global finance? How was socialist finance taken over by networks of secret services and company managers, who supported and structured the transition to authoritarian, capitalist parties in the late 1980s and 1990s? Here we look at the entanglements of global and socialist finance in Yugoslavia and to reflect on the new forms of peripheralization generated by financial flows in post-crisis Europe.

Johanna Bockman is Associate Professor of Global Affairs and Sociology at George Mason University. She is the author of the book Markets in the Name of Socialism: The Left-Wing Origins of Neoliberalism and the article “Socialist Globalization against Capitalist Neocolonialism: the Economic Ideas behind the NIEO” in Humanity. She is currently working on socialist, nonaligned banks and globalization.

Fabio Mattioli is Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Melbourne. His research focuses on the connection between finance, politics, and labor at the European periphery. Currently, he is working on a book manuscript titled Illiquidity and Power: The Economics of Authoritarianism at the Margins of Europe.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics and LeftEast

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

11/10: Discussion on Affordable Housing with Author Glyn Robbins

11/10: Discussion on Affordable Housing with Author Glyn Robbins

11/10/2017
6:00 pm - 8:30 pm
CUNY Graduate Center

Discussion on Affordable Housing with Author Glyn Robbins

Friday, November 10

6:30-8:30 PM

Room 9206

The Graduate Center, CUNY

365 5th Ave, New York, New York 10016

Join Glyn Robbins and a panel of local housing activists for a roundtable discussion at the CUNY Graduate Center to discuss ideas for a progressive housing agenda in our city —rent control, new low income housing, and more!

London-based Glyn Robbins is a housing campaigner and leader of Defend Council Housing in the UK, NAHT’s sister organization. In 2015, Glyn kicked off a tour of the US tenant movement with stops in major cities, including the Big Apple. He has published a terrific book, There’s No Place: The American Housing Crisis and What It Means for the UK.

Glyn is visiting the US for a few days to share his book and serve as a catalyst to bring housing campaigners together, in DC, NYC and Boston. Glyn will be joined by Jon Furlong, who is featured promiently in the book, as well as others for a discussion about affordable housing.

Copies of There’s No Place will be available for purchase at the event. Proceeds will be split between Defend Council Housing and the National Alliance of HUD Tenants, the main sponsor of the event. Tenants & Neighbors is also a sponsor of this this event.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

This event is co-sponsored by The Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Defend Council Housing, Tenants & Housing and the National Alliance of HUD Tenants.

11/3 (11/6; 11/13; 11/20): Into the contradiction – And other maxims of Anthropological Political Economy

11/3 (11/6; 11/13; 11/20): Into the contradiction – And other maxims of Anthropological Political Economy

11/03/2017
4:15 pm - 6:15 pm
C415a

 

Into the contradiction – And other maxims of Anthropological Political Economy:

A Series of 4 Talks with Don Kalb at the Graduate Center

Friday, November 3:  Red October and Anthropology: Centennial Reflections

Room C415A 4:15-6:15

Monday, November 6: The Capitalist Transition Debate: There and Back Again

Rooms 9206/9207 6:30-8:30

Monday, November 13: The Floating Signifier of the “Global Middle Class”

Skylight Room 6:30-8:30

Monday, November 20: Populism and Dignity on Left and Right.

Skylight Room 6:30-8:30

Don Kalb is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen and until recently professor of sociology and social anthropology at Central European University; he is also a senior researcher at Utrecht University and a distinguished visiting professor at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle, Germany. He has served as a Director of the SOCO program at the IWM in Vienna (Social Consequences of Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe) and was a Braudel Fellow at the EUI (2013), and a Distinghuished Visiting Professor at the Advanced Research Collaborative at CUNY Graduate Center in New York (2015). At the MPI in Halle he leads the ‘Financialization Project’ (with Chris Hann). In 2017 he started the project ‘Frontiers of Value’ at the University of Bergen, Norway.

His books include Expanding Class: Power and Everyday Politics in Industrial Communities, The Netherlands, 1850-1950 (Duke University Press), 1997; The Ends of Globalization. Bringing Society back in, (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers), 2000; Globalization and Development: Key Issues and Debates (Kluwer Academic Publishers), 2004; Critical Junctions: Anthropology and History beyond the Cultural Turn (Berghahn), 2005; Headlines of Nation, Subtexts of Class: Working Class Populism and the Return of the Repressed in Neoliberal Europe, (Berghahn) 2011; Anthropologies of Class (Cambridge U.P), 2015. He is Founding Editor of Focaal – Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology and of FocaalBlog

THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, GRADUATE CENTER, CUNY. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

11/01: SPIRALLING OUT OF CONTROL: A CONVERSATION ON THE FATE OF CAPITAL AND CAPITALISM IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

11/01: SPIRALLING OUT OF CONTROL: A CONVERSATION ON THE FATE OF CAPITAL AND CAPITALISM IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

11/01/2017
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Proshansky Auditorium

 

On the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the publication of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital, the Center for Place, Culture and Politics and Jacobin Magazine invite you to:

SPIRALLING OUT OF CONTROL: ON THE FATE OF CAPITAL AND CAPITALISM IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN NANCY FRASER AND DAVID HARVEY 

MODERATED BY BHASKAR SUNKARA

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST, 2017

6:30 PM

Proshansky Auditorium, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York

 

Nancy Fraser is Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor at the New School for Social Research and holder of an international research chair at the Collège d’études mondiales, Paris. Trained as a philosopher at CUNY, she specializes in critical social theory and political philosophy. Her new book, Capitalism: A Conversation in Critical Theory, co-authored with Rahel Jaeggi, will be published by Polity Press in spring 2018. She has theorized capitalism’s relation to democracy, racial oppression, social reproduction, ecological crisis, and feminist movements in a series of linked essays in New Left Review and Critical Historical Studies and in Fortunes of Feminism: From State-Managed Capitalism to Neoliberal Crisis (2013). Fraser’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and was cited twice by the Brazilian Supreme Court (in decisions upholding marriage equality and affirmative action). She is currently President of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division and Roth Family Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Dartmouth College.

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the City University of New York (CUNY) and author of various books, articles, and lectures. He is the author of Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism(Profile Books, 2014), one of The Guardian’s(http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/dec/02/books-christmas-presents-economics-reviews“) Best Books of 2011, The Enigma of Capital and the Crises of Capitalism (Oxford University Press, 2010). Other books include A Companion to Marx’s Capital, Limits to Capital, and Social Justice and the City. Professor Harvey has been teaching Karl Marx’s Capital for nearly 40 years. His lectures on Marx’s Volumes I and II are available for download (free) on his website.  He was director of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics from 2008-2014. His new book, published by Oxford University Press, is called Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic Reason.

Bhaskar Sunkara is the founding editor and publisher of Jacobin magazine, as well as the publisher of Catalyst: A Journal of Theory and Strategy.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

THIS EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR PLACE, CULTURE AND POLITICS AT THE GRADUATE CENTER, CUNY, AND JACOBIN MAGAZINE

 

 

10/27 & 10/28: Philosophy and Religion in Africana Traditions Conference: Intersectionality and the Politics of Activism

10/27 & 10/28: Philosophy and Religion in Africana Traditions Conference: Intersectionality and the Politics of Activism

10/27/2017 - 10/28/2017
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Room 9204

 On behalf of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics and HUMANITAS: The Africana Ethical and Cultural society we invite you to:

Philosophy and Religion Conference in Africana Traditions 2017: Intersectionality and the Politics of Activism

Friday October 23, 2017 9:30am — 6:00pm

Center for Place, Culture and Politics
The Graduate Center of The City University of New York Rooms 9204/9205
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10016

MORNING SESSION 9:30am – 12:30pm

9:30am – 9:50am
Greetings and Opening Statement: J. Everet Green – Mercy College Greetings: Mary Taylor – CUNY: The Graduate Center

10:00am – 11:00a                                                                                                                         “Reflections on the Terrains of the Struggle for Black Freedom in the 21st Century”

Speaker: Mathylde Frontus, Ph.D. – Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University Chair: Brittany O’Neal, Ph.D. – Adjunct Professor, Lehman College, CUNY

11:00am – 12:30pm                                                                                                                                 “The Movement for Black Lives”

Speaker: Sara Mokuria M.A., Senior Research Associate, UT Dallas Institute for Urban Policy Research

Chair: Zay D. Green M.A.,-HUMANITAS

LUNCH 12:30pm – 1:30pm

AFTERNOON SESSION 1:30pm – 6:00pm

1:35pm – 1:45pm
Greetings and Introduction: J. Everet Green – Mercy College

1:50pm – 2:50pm                                                                                                                                  “I, John De Conqueror: Black Male Self-Recovery in the U.S.”

Speaker: John White Fordham University Chair: Julie Siestreem

3:00pm – 4:30pm                                                                                                                                           “Hubert Harrison and the Militant ‘New Negro Movement’” Speaker: Jeffrey B. Perry, Ph.D. – Independent Scholar
Chair: Mathylde Frontus

4:30pm – 5:50pm                                                                                                                  Intersectionality and the Politics of Activism

Panel Discussion Chair: Brittany O’Neal – Lehman College Speakers: Sonia Vas Borges CUNY Graduate Center

Vicki Mokuria – Texas A&M
Sara Mokuria M.A., Senior Research Associate, UT Dallas Institute for

Urban Policy Research
Aileen Mokuria – Harvard

Saturday, OCTOBER 28, 2017 9:30am — 6:00pm

Mayday Community Space 176 St. Nicholas Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11237                                             ***NOT AT CUNY GRADUATE CENTER

MORNING SESSION 10:00am – 12:30pm

10:00am – 11:00am
“Grace Lee & Jimmy Boggs’ Oblique Counter-Practice” [R]evolution in Love & Struggle with Black Humanism

Speaker: Josef Mendoza, Ph.D. – Mercy College Chair: Aileen Mokuria – Harvard

11:00am – 12:30pm                                                                                                                                      ‘I am Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired’: Critical Thought in the Interest of Material Equality”

Speaker: Brittany O’Neal, Ph.D. – Lehman College, CUNY Chair: Zay D. Green-HUMANITAS

1:40pm – 3:00pm

LUNCH 12:30pm – 1:30pm

AFTERNOON SESSION 1:40pm – 6:00pm                                                                                           “Islamic Genesis of Satyagraha: Gandhi’s Neglected Partners”

Speaker: Greg Moses, Ph. D. Texas State University Chair: Vicki Mokuria – Texas A&M

3:00pm – 4:00pm                                                                                                                                  “Homeless and the Policing of the Commons”

Speaker: Odilka Santiago

4:00pm – 5:45pm                                                                                                                              Intersectionality and the Politics of Activism Panel Discussion

Speakers: Zay D. Green, J. Everet Green, Greg Moses, Brittany O’Neal

This conference is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the CUNY Graduate Center and HUMANITAS: The Africana Ethical and Cultural Society.

For more information, please contact J. Everet Green at: everet@verizon.net

THIS IS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10