Events

Film Screening: Rerooting the Motor City: Notes on a City in Transformation

05/07/2015
7:00 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

Rerooting the Motor City: Notes on a City in Transformation:

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Rerooting the Motor City: Notes on a City in Transformation was produced by Paper Tiger Television members: Maria Byck, Amanda Matles, Nadia Mohamed, Adrienne Silverman. From food deserts, to the plans to “rightsize” the city, Detroiters resist, rework, and remain resilient given the social and ecological failures of post-industrial global capitalism. With a critical lens on race and class dynamics, the human cost of industrial capitalism, produced scarcity and the problematics of frontier mentalities subtending “progressive” politics in the United States today are discussed. Rerooting weaves together segments on Detroit’s labor history, the roots of Detroit’s urban agriculture movement, a critical look at philanthro-capitalism and its relationship to urban renewal, as well as media (mis)representations of a city in transformation.

The screening will be followed by a discussion and Q&A with filmmakers Adrienne Silverman and Nadia Mohamed, and CUNY scholars Cindi Katz and Amanda Matles (Earth and Environmental Sciences), and will be moderated by CUNY scholar Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land (Sociology).

May 7
7:00 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

Film Screening: Ecumenopolis: City Without Limits

04/16/2015
7:00 pm
Room 5414

Ecumenopolis: City Without Limits 

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Ekümenopolis tells the story of Istanbul on a neo-liberal course to destruction. It follows the story of a migrant family from the demolition of their neighborhood to their on-going struggle for housing rights. The film takes a look at the city on a macro level and through the eyes of experts, going from the tops of mushrooming skyscrapers to the depths of the railway tunnel under the Bosphorous strait; from the historic neighborhoods in the south to the forests in the north. It’s an Istanbul going from 15 million to 30 million. It’s an Istanbul going from 2 million cars to 8 million. It’s the Istanbul of the future that will soon engulf the entire region. It’s an Istanbul you have never seen before.

The screening will be followed by a discussion and Q&A with filmmaker Imre Azem, CUNY scholar Duygu Parmaksizoglu (Anthropology), and will be moderated by CUNY scholar Joshua Scannell (Sociology).

April 16
7:00 p.m.
Doctoral Students’ Council Lounge (Room 5414).

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Film Screening: The Rink

03/26/2015
7:00 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

The Rink 

Branch Brook Park Roller Rink, located in Newark, NJ, is one of the few remaining urban rinks of its kind. This concrete structure is nestled in a public park bordered by public housing and a highway. Upon first glance, the exterior resembles a fallout shelter; however, the streamers and lights of the interior are reminiscent of 1970s roller discos. This 55 minute documentary depicts a space cherished by skaters and a city struggling to move beyond its past and forge a new narrative amidst contemporary social issues.

The screening will be followed by a discussion and Q&A with filmmakers Sarah Friedland and Ryan Joseph, Graduate Center alumni CalvinJohn Smiley, and will be moderated by CUNY scholar Brenden Beck (Sociology).

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March 26
7:00 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

Dismantling Racism in the Food System

03/18/2015
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Room 9206/9207

A talk by Eric Holt-Giménez  and discussion led by Marc Edelman.

Today’s food system has been shaped by the privatization of public goods and the deregulation of corporate capital, leading to the highest levels of global inequality in economic history. The staggering social and environmental costs of this transition have hit people of color the hardest; paring back health, education and welfare functions of government and crippling our capacity to respond to these problems by destroying much of the public sphere.  Our communities have been weakened, exacerbating the violence, intensifying racial tensions and deepening cultural divides. In many ways the community food movement, with its projects for a fair, sustainable, healthy food system is rebuilding our public sphere from the ground up.  But we can’t rebuild the public sphere without addressing the issues which divide us. For many communities this means addressing racism. Understanding where and how racism manifests itself in the food system, recognizing it within our movement and our organizations and within ourselves is not extra work for an equitable food system; it is the work.

Eric Holt-Gimenez & Joann Lo at the opening of the Food Labor Center at UC Berkeley on Dec.  13. 2012_CROPPED

Eric Holt-Giménez has been Executive Director of Food First since 2006. He is the editor of the Food First book Food Movements Unite! Strategies to Transform Our Food Systems; co-author of Food Rebellions! Crisis and the Hunger for Justice with Raj Patel and Annie Shattuck; and author of the book Campesino a Campesino: Voices from Latin America’s Farmer to Farmer Movement for Sustainable Agriculture and of many academic, magazine and news articles. Of Basque and Puerto Rican heritage, Eric grew up milking cows and pitching hay in Point Reyes, CA, where he learned that putting food on the table is hard work. After studying rural education and biology at the University of Oregon and Evergreen State College, he traveled through Mexico and Central America, where he was drawn to the simple life of small-scale farmers.

Marc Edelman’s research and writing have focused on agrarian issues, social movements, and a variety of Latin American topics, including the historical roots of nationalism and contemporary politics. Most of his work has dealt with changing land tenure and land use patterns, production systems, rural class relations, and social movements in Central America. He has a longstanding concern with understanding changing forms of capitalism and with the politics of controlling markets, whether through welfare states, civil society pressure or global trade rules. During the mid 1980s, after seeing his fieldwork zone in northern Costa Rica tragically converted into a staging area for the civil war in Nicaragua, he also carried out research in the USSR and wrote extensively on Soviet-Latin American relations.

Currently, Edelman is working on a project, supported by the National Science Foundation and the PSC-CUNY Grants Program, on the efforts of transnational agrarian movements to have the United Nations approve a declaration on the rights of peasants.  He is also completing a book on peasant involvement in global civil society movements and transnational networking among small farmer organizations.

Edelman has served on the editorial boards of American Anthropologist (Book Review Editor, 2002-5), American Ethnologist (2011-), Anuario de Estudios Centroamericanos (Consejo Editorial Internacional, 2008-), Critique of Anthropology (1998-), Cuadernos de Antropología (Comité Científico, 2009-), Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment (1995-98, 2013-), Focaal – Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology (2004-), Journal of Agrarian Change (2008-), Journal of Latin American Anthropology (1994-99), Journal of Peasant Studies (Editorial Collective, 2009-), Latin American Research Review (2000-2003), NACLA Report on the Americas (1999-2006), Revue TRACE [Travaux et Recherches dans les Amériques du Centre]  (2012-),  and Studies in Comparative International Development (2005-).

This event is open and free to the public

“Private Capital for Public Good”: Social Impact Bonds and the New Market-Based ‘Public Responsibility’ Initiatives

03/10/2015
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

Presentation by Robert Ogman, Doctoral Researcher at De Montfort University (U.K.)

March 10, 2015
6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Sociology Lounge, Graduate Center, CUNY.

This presentation focuses on Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) as part of an emerging crisis governance strategy. Against many expectations, post-2008 developments did not follow a “postneoliberal” trajectory (Brand and Sekler 2009), but rather deepened modes of market governance through the policies of fiscal austerity (Peck 2012) and the associated insulation of public authority in a “post-democracy” (Jessop 2013; Crouch 2011). However, this has exacerbated the social crisis and further eroded political legitimacy. As a result, we’re witnessing the growth of policy focused on “social impact” and “public responsibility”, yet, not through the roll-back of markets, but through the development of a “social investment market”. This presentation focuses on a critical example of this, the “Social Impact Bond” (SIB), as a “new [initiative] of ‘public responsibility’ within market modes of governance” (Sprague 2010).

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Introduced in 2010, more than 100 SIBs now exist across the globe, concentrated mostly in the U.S. and U.K. These promise to “blend fiscal and social returns” through a financial product based on the performance of targeted social policy interventions. In times of austerity, these claim to leverage private capital for public good, by offering private returns to investors when programs effectively lower levels of recidivism, unemployment, homelessness, and hence lower government expenditures.

This presentation takes a Cultural Political Economy approach (Sum and Jessop 2014) to situate SIBs within the processes by which hegemony is restored and reshaped. I will describe therefore both institutional structure of this policy instrument and its associated discursive repertoire, and consider its broader political significance as a crisis governance strategy. SIBs will be situated as part of a “hegemony project” (Kannankulam and Georgi 2014) that explicitly responds to the problems of “trickle-down economics”, yet which simultaneously rejects a politics of redistribution and decommodification. My presentation will therefore focus on how SIBs construct “crisis narratives” and “imagined recoveries” (Sum and Jessop 2014), and shape and limit the institutional “corridors” for political action (Brand 2014).

Robert Ogman is a doctoral researcher at the Department of Politics and Public Policy at De Montfort University (Leicester, U.K.), where he focuses on Social Impact Bonds as part of an emerging crisis governance strategy in the U.K. and U.S. He previously focused on social movement responses to the crisis, and published a study for the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation (Berlin), “The U.S. Occupy Movement – Since the Eviction from the Squares” (http://www.rosalux.de/publication/40331/the-us-occupy-movement-since-the-eviction-from-the-squares.html). He received his MA in Political Science from The University of Potsdam, and his BA from The New School. Originally from the U.S., he now resides in Berlin, Germany.

 

Food Security Governance: Empowering Communities, Regulating Corporations

03/10/2015
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

The University Food Policy Collaborative of New York City presents

A panel discussion celebrating the release of a new book by Nora McKeon:

Food Security Governance: Empowering Communities, Regulating Corporations

Today’s global food system generates hunger alongside of land grabs, food waste, health problems, massive greenhouse gas emissions. Nora McKeon’s just-released book explains why we find ourselves in this situation and explores what we can do to change it. In her talk she will contrast how actors link up in corporate global food chains and in the local food systems that are considered to be “alternative” but in fact feed most of the world’s population. She will describe how communities around the world are protecting their access to resources and building better ways of food provision and discuss how the Committee on World Food Security – a uniquely inclusive global policy forum since its reform in 2009 – could be supportive of these efforts. The talk will conclude with a call to blow the whistle on predatory capitalism by building effective public policy instruments for accountable governance and extending their authority to the realm of regulating markets and corporations.

March 10, 2015
5:00-6:30 PM
Skylight Conference Room 9th Floor
Graduate Center, CUNY.

Food book

 

Respondents will include:

Thomas Forster, New School Food Studies, Post 2015 Food and Agriculture Cluster

Saulo Araujo, Director of the Global Movements Program at WhyHunger

Moderated by Nicholas Freudenberg, Distinguished Professor of Public Health, CUNY School of Public Health & Hunter College, and Faculty Director, NYC Food Policy Center at Hunter College

For more information and to order Food Security Governance: Empowering communities, regulating corporations, please visit: www.routledge.com/9780415529105

*To activate your 20% discount, visit the book’s page and simply enter the code LRK69 at check-out. This applies only to books purchased on the website and cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer.

About the author:

Following studies at Harvard and the Sorbonne and a career at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Nora McKeon is now engaged in teaching, writing and advocacy on food issues and social movements

The University Food Policy Collaborative of New York City is a network of food policy focused-faculty, students and staff from learning institutions city-wide, including CUNY, Teacher’s College, Columbia University, NYU and The New School.

Please RSVP here https://www.eventbrite.com/e/food-security-governance-empowering-communities-regulating-corporations-tickets-15672373491

 

 

Symposium: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON SLAVERIES IN THE AFRICAN WORLD

03/06/2015
All Day
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

On the heels of the international conference on “Slavery in Africa” held in Kenya and Kwasi Konadu’s Transatlantic Africa, which tells the story of transatlantic slaving through African optics and voices, this symposium brings together leading thinkers of global slaveries in the African world to share their work through a full-day of engaged dialogue, offering new perspectives and directions.

March 6
9 a.m.
Skylight Room, Graduate Center, CUNY.

Symposium

 

This program is sponsored by the Advanced Research Collaborative and the Ph.D Program in History. The symposium is free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

Film Screening: Rezoning Harlem

03/05/2015
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Room 5414

Rezoning Harlem follows longtime members of the Harlem community as they fight a 2008 rezoning that threatens to erase the history and culture of their legendary neighborhood and replace it with luxury housing, offices, and big-box retail. A shocking expose of how a group of ordinary citizens, who are passionate about the future of one of the city’s most treasured neighborhoods, are systematically shut out of the city’s decision-making process, revealing New York City’s broken public review system and provoking discussion on what we can do about it.

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The screening will be followed by a discussion and Q&A with filmmaker Tamara Gubernat, Urban Affairs and Planning Professor Tom Agnotti (The Graduate Center and Hunter College), M. Ndigo Washington (founder of Take Back Our City), and will be moderated by CUNY scholar Pilar Ortiz (Sociology).

March 5
7:00 pm
Doctoral Students’ Council Lounge (Room 5414).

Stories of Struggle: Histories of Childcare Activism at CUNY

03/04/2015
6:00 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112
Tahir Butt, Sujatha Fernandes, Alyssia Osorio, James Small, LaTrella Thornton will join us.
What can we learn from CUNY’s past? Join scholars and activists who were involved in the fight for childcare during the period of open admissions at City College in the 1970s as they explore the history of childcare activism at CUNY. Students fighting to preserve those spaces today will add to the discussion, moderated by Sujatha Fernandes

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Wednesday March 4
6:00pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

Cosponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics; and the Mellon Seminar in Public Engagement and Collaborative Research.

This event is open and free to the public.  More information:


Feminist Perspectives on Resistance and Solidarity in Palestine and Israel

02/27/2015
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Room C201

The Center for the Study of Women and Society
presents:
Feminist Perspectives on Resistance and Solidarity in Palestine and Israel

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Rabab Abdulhadi and Simona Sharoni met over twenty five years ago and have collaborated on multiple projects. They will discuss the following topics: the distorted dominant media coverage of the assault which ignored the power disparities between Palestinians and Israel; the racist and gendered images and statements deployed by Israeli officials and citizens to legitimize the violence; the impact of the violence on, and the responses of Palestinian and Israeli women; the response of the international community and the growing visibility and impact of the global movement of Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS), the efforts to hold Israeli officials accountable and investigate possible violations of human rights and international conventions; and prospects for a just and lasting peace in the region in the aftermath of the Israeli war on Gaza and the earlier repressive campaign in the West Bank.

Friday, February 27, 2015
3:00-5:00pm
Room C201
The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Rabab Abdulhadi is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies/Race and Resistance Studies and the Senior Scholar of the Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Initiative at the College of Ethnic Studies, San Francisco State University. She is a co-founder of the Islamophobia Studies Journal, the Union of Palestinian Women’s Associations in North America (UPWA), and the Palestine Solidarity Committee (PSC).

Simona Sharoni is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the State University of New York in Plattsburgh. Sharoni is the founding Executive Director of the Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA), a founding member of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies Section (FTGS) at the International Studies Association (ISA), and co-founder of Faculty Against Rape (FAR).

Co-sponsored with the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics.

The event is free and open to the public.
For more information see the Women’s Studies website: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/womencenter\

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