Events

Save the Date: Consciousness and Revolution II: May 5th–6th 2007

Save the Date: Consciousness and Revolution II: May 5th–6th 2007

05/05/2017 - 05/06/2017
All Day
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Save the Date
Friday, May 5th & Saturday, May 6th

Consciousness and Revolution II: Educating for Change in the Era of Authoritarian Populism
Center for Place, Culture, and Politics Annual Conference, Grad Center, CUNY

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Friday, May 5th & Saturday, May 6th
The Graduate Center, CUNY
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016

The profound contemporary alienations shaped by long-term crisis require revolutions in the nature of struggle in order consciously to change the external world. Education is central to such change. Our conference and workshops combine militant scholars and scholarly militants to share knowledge, resources, history, and practices related to the role of pedagogy for developing consciousness in the present moment. We focus on ad hoc and insurgent educational form-and-content, from survival schools in the Dakotas (including the one recently at the Standing Rock #NODAPL occupation), the PAIGC educational program that unrolled during the 1961–1974 war of liberation in Guinée-Bissau, “pop up” universities organized by young militants in conjunction with housing, anti-police, and other struggles in Portugal’s immigrant communities, Zapatista escuelitas in Chiapas, research-center interventions in established universities such as CUNY, University of Quito, and elsewhere, union- and worker-center based political education in apartheid South Africa and neoliberal USA, and the purpose and ambition of current student strikes and uprisings in India, South Africa, Brasil, and beyond.

**The conference is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Registration information will be publicized soon**

3/6: Global Perspectives on the Fight for Higher Education

3/6: Global Perspectives on the Fight for Higher Education

03/06/2017
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

3/6: Global Perspectives on the Fight for Higher Education

Monday, March 6, 2017
2 pm – 4 pm
Skylight Room (9100)
Livestream: bit.ly/fight4edu-live
RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/global-perspectives-on-the-fight-for-higher-education-registration-32250509141

Join the Futures Initiative for a roundtable discussion on “Global Perspectives on the Fight for Higher Education,” in which we will share strategies across the globe and highlight the urgent need for abolition and decolonial education. The discussion will (re)focus our collective attention on how the university can be repurposed to serve the larger public towards liberatory ends.

The discussion will be moderated by Allison Guess (Futures Initiative Fellow, GC Doctoral Student in Earth and Environmental Sciences (Geography).

This roundtable discussion is the 5th in this year’s series The University Worth Fighting For and ties liberation pedagogical practices to race, class, gender and institutional change.

During and after the event, add your questions and comments to this Google Doc. We also invite you to join a Twitter chat on “The Global Fight for Higher Education” hosted by HASTAC Scholars on March 6th from 4p.m. to 5 p.m. at the hashtag #fight4edu.

 

Event Schedule: 
2:00-3:00: Marianna Poyares (Occupy in Brazil, high schools & Universities) Zandi Radebe   (Demands for Decolonial Edu. in South Africa) Cleopatra Funzani Mtembu (Student organizing & Fallist Movement, South Africa)

3:00-4:00: Eve Tuck (Indigenous Education in Canada) Zee Dempster (PSC at CUNY and why important to get involved) Arianna Martinez (Sanctuary Movement at LaGuardia)

4:00: Closing Remarks

 

Speakers: 
Marianna Poyares is a PhD student at The New School for Social Research in Philosophy. Before moving to NYC, Poyares earned a Masters in at the University of São Paulo in Philosophy and taught Portuguese at Bridge Languatec. Poyares then went on to work at the Department of Education of the City Government of Rio de Janeiro, as administrator, coordinating a project that blended sports and education in Middle Schools, part of the so-called Olympic legacy. She also worked as part-time faculty at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro while the nation-wide protests of 2013 were taking place. Now in NYC, she has been working at the Provost Office of The New School in designing curricula for new undergraduate initiatives. Her academic research focuses on ethics and political philosophy. She is particularly interested in education as emancipation – taking from Liberation Philosophy – and in the active role of educational institutions within communities.

Zandi Radebe is a junior lecturer in the department of Political Science at the University of South Africa. She teaches Political Philosophy and her research interest include Black Radical Thought, Black Consciousness Pan Afrikan Thought and Black Existentialism. Radebe is a member of the UNISA Decoloniality Collective and has been instrumental in the advancement of Decolonility on her campus, including coordinating the annual UNISA Summer School on Decolonizing Knowledge, Power and Being program. As an activist and scholar. Radebe is the founder of many liberation-based organizations in her community, including Siyaphambili Youth Pioneers (SYP); a youth mentorship program that engages young minds in a number of consciousness building activities through education and learning. Radebe is also the leader and founder of the Blackhouse Kollective; a Soweto based initiative that concerns with community programs that education on Anti-Black racism and Decoloniality through activism and scholarship. The Kollective has been very instrumental in the student struggles in South Africa and is home to social activists, artist, students in law; philosophy, political sciences, educators, professors, intellectuals and young professionals. The Blackhouse Kollective has internationally acknowledged luminaries in our arena of discourse to share knowledge with our community through public lectures. These leading thinkers include Charles Mills, Lewis Gordon, Janine Jones, Joy James, Magobo Ramose, Cde President Tiyani Mabasa, Oyeronke Oyewumi, CK Raju and Nelson Maldonado-Torres. The long term objective is building community driven centre of knowledge production centre open to all  black people and for the purpose of appropriating  Black Thought as a tool for the liberation of occupied Azania.

Cleopatra Funzani Mtembu is a young activist born in Kagiso and grew up in Soweto South Africa. A Finance graduate from the University of Johannesburg, she is currently pursuing her postgraduate studies. Fees Must Fall and Outsourcing Must Fall was the beginning of her on the ground activism and she was one of the students in the forefront of these movements within her university. Fees Must Fall is a call made by students across universities in South Africa for the decolonization of the school curriculum and stood in opposition to the exorbitant cost of studies that lead to the commodification of education. Outsourcing Must Fall emanated from recognizing that students and workers’ struggles are intertwined. Students and workers demanded that the universities insource all its unskilled workers so to receive similar benefits as its skilled workers and to pay them decent salaries.  She is a member of the Fallist movement, which primarily has three guiding cardinal pillars: Black Consciousness, Pan-Africanism and Black radical feminism. She is also a member and a student of the Blackhouse Kollective, a community based decolonization organization.

Zee Dempster is the Assistant Director of IRADAC and the Assistant Coordinator of the Africana Studies Certificate Program at the Graduate Center.  She has a B.S in Computer Science and a M.A in Government and Politics from St. John’s University.  She is an active union member who serves as a HEO delegate for the PSC (Professional Staff Congress) Graduate Center chapter, on the Labor Management and Adjunct committees and as a HEO representative to the PSC CUNY Welfare Fund.

Eve Tuck is Associate Professor of Critical Race and Indigenous Studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto. She is a William T Grant Scholar (2015-2020) and was a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in 2011.Tuck’s writing and research is on urban education and Indigenous studies. As a whole, her work focuses on how Indigenous social thought can be engaged to create more fair and just social policy, more meaningful social movements, and when that doesn’t work, robust approaches to decolonization. Tuck is Unangax and is an enrolled member of the Aleut Community of St. Paul Island, Alaska.

Arianna Martinez is an Associate Professor of Urban Studies at LaGuardia Community College. She received her PhD from Rutgers University in urban planning and geography. She has analyzed the criminalization of Latino immigrant communities in municipalities where both space and citizenship are hotly contested. Martinez’s current scholarship focuses on national immigration policy, the urban transformation and empowerment of Latino communities, and LGBTQ immigrant enclaves. She is happy to call Queens her home.

Event Organizer & Moderator:
Allison Guess is a Doctoral Fellow at the Futures Initiative and PhD student in the program of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Geography) at the Graduate Center at CUNY. Guess’ research is looks at Black geographies, Black people’s relationships to land in the Western Hemisphere and (Black) productions of place. Concerned with collective liberation, Allison is theorizing (Black geographic) abundance and some of her scholarly work can be found published in American Quarterly, Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society and Departures in Critical Qualitative Research. Aside from academia Allison has been a member of the Black/Land Project, a community research/interview project that amplifies Black people’s relationships to land and place and she is the New York City network leader for a national Black-led organization called Outdoor Afro. Allison calls herself a geotheorist of Black relationships to land, a concept she coined in 2014. Follow Allison on Twitter at @AllisonGuess1

 

 

This event is co-sponsored by The Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Women of Color Network, The Center for the Humanities and HASTAC. It is free and open to the public.

BOOK EVENT: Third Wave Capitalism: How Money, Power, and the Pursuit of Self-Interest have Imperiled the American Dream

BOOK EVENT: Third Wave Capitalism: How Money, Power, and the Pursuit of Self-Interest have Imperiled the American Dream

02/15/2017
6:30 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

February 15, 2017
6:30
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

America of recent decades is a land of contradictions: Soaring wealth and a poverty level above that of 1973; productivity up but wages for most Americans stagnant; the apotheosis of individual freedom and the paralysis of democracy; the election of a black president and the incarceration of a million black men; a growing acceptance of racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual diversity and the triumph of a racially, ethnically, and sexually incendiary campaign for president; the increase in educational attainment and the growing mismatch between student skills and the needs of the job market; the cost of medical care skyrocketing and a decline in indicators of Americans’ health compared to other affluent countries; long periods of prosperity and soaring rates of depression, anxiety, and self-reported loneliness; a stagnating economy for most Americans and rage directed at those who would use government to provide relief.

Third Wave Capitalism seeks to understand these contradictions. It argues that the 1970s mark a turning point in American history. Just as the industrial capitalism of the nineteenth century gave way to the corporate capitalism of the first part of the twentieth century, so the latter gave way to a third phase. “Third Wave Capitalism” is distinguished by the emergence of giant multinational corporations and large “non-profit” organizations; by novel technologies such as computers, the Internet, and biotech; and by globalization of production and of the market. At a deeper level, it is characterized by a rise in “rent-seeking” – the use of power to grab a larger share of the aggregate social wealth (as opposed to making money by providing something more or different that before); by a blurring of the lines between public and private sectors; by the decline of unions and other countervailing forces, and by the rise of virulent individualism and uncontested free market ideologies at the expense of any collective will to solve societal problems.

The book pursues this theme with detailed studies of the health care system, the school reform movement, the persistence of racial disparities and of poverty and the rise of the criminal justice system as a system of social control, the growing pressures on professionals such as writers and teachers, and the apparent rise in levels of emotional distress (expressed both as depression and anxiety and as political rage). It concludes with speculations as to the obstacles and preconditions for progressive social change.

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Speakers

John Ehrenreich is Professor of Psychology (formerly Professor of American Studies) at the State University of New York – Old Westbury. He is best known for his work on health care politics, including The American Health Empire: Power, Profits, and Politics (1971, co-authored with his then-wife, Barbara Ehrenreich), and The Cultural Crisis of Modern Medicine (1976); his work with Barbara Ehrenreich on the “professional managerial class;” and his study of the history of American social policy, The Altruistic Imagination (1985). He is a 2016-2017 Visiting Research Scholar at the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. His most recent book, Third Wave Capitalism: How Money, Power, and the Pursuit of Self Interest have Imperiled the American Dream, was published by Cornell University Press in 2016.

Mimi Abramovitz is Bertha Capen Reynolds Professor at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College. She has written extensively about the issues of women, work, poverty, social welfare policy, and the history of activism among low income women. Her books include the award-winning Under Attack, Fighting Back: Women and Welfare in the U.S. (2000); Regulating the Lives of Women: Social Welfare Policy From Colonial Times to the Present, (1999); and, with Joel Blau, The Dynamics of Social Welfare Policy ( 2010). Dr. Abramovitz has been inducted into the Columbia University School of Social Work Hall of Fame and received the 2013 Humanitarian and Leadership Award from the Association for International Conferences.

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the City University of New York (CUNY) and author of various books, articles, and lectures. His books include Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism (2014) and The Enigma of Capital and the Crises of Capitalism (2010), A Companion to Marx’s Capital (2010), and A Brief History of Neo-Liberalism (2005). Professor Harvey was director of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics from 2008-2014, and is currently Research Director at the Center.

Frances Fox Piven is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the City University of New York (CUNY). Piven is known equally for her contributions to social theory and for her social activism. A veteran of the war on poverty and subsequent welfare-rights protests both in New York City and on the national stage, she has been instrumental in formulating the theoretical underpinnings of those movements. Among her many books are the best selling Poor People’s Movements (1977), and Regulating the Poor: The Functions of Public Welfare (1972), both coauthored with Richard CA. Cloward, and Challenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America (2008). Professor Piven was president of the American Sociological Association in 2007.

Peter Hitchcock is Professor of English at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of five books, including The Long Space: Transnationalism and Post Colonial Form (2009). He is Associate Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.

Book Event: The Civil war in the United States; Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

Book Event: The Civil war in the United States; Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

12/06/2016
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

12/6: Book Event: The Civil War in the United States; Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

December 6, 2016
6 -8 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

image001-2Andrew Zimmerman will discuss his new edition of the writings of Marx and Engels on the American Civil War, emphasizing the importance of these writings for thinking about race, class, and revolution today. The American Civil War so profoundly shaped Marx and Engels’s understanding of social revolution and international politics that it marks a watershed in the history of communism as much as it does in the history of the United States. A complete revision of the 1937 edition of the Civil War writings of Marx and Engels, the book incorporates new texts by Marx and Engels, as well as by US authors, including Communist Union Army officer Joseph Weydemeyer and African American scholar and activist W.E.B. Du Bois. The first edition of the book itself is also a landmark in the history of anti-communist repression in the United States: its editor, Herbert Morais (publishing under the pseudonym Richard Enmale), was fired from Brooklyn College in part for producing that edition.

 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.

DAVID HARVEY LECTURE SERIES (updated dates and locations): MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

DAVID HARVEY LECTURE SERIES (updated dates and locations): MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY

12/05/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room 9204

MARX AND CAPITAL: THE CONCEPT, THE BOOK, THE HISTORY
A SERIES OF 6 MONDAY EVENING LECTURES IN POLITICAL ECONOMY BY DAVID HARVEY

6:30-8:30 PM

DECEMBER 5: BAD INFINITY AND THE MADNESS OF ECONOMIC REASON (rooms 9204/9205/9206/9207 -capacity 160)

365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016

****Due to overwhelming interest, some locations and dates of these events have been changed. Please note carefully the new locations and dates****

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All lectures in this series will be held from 6:30-8:30 PM  at 365 5th Avenue, NY, NY 10016.

*Please note carefully the locations for each date and the capacity of the room, as entry is on a first come basis.

**Videos of the first three lectures have been posted on David Harvey’s website and the CPCP website, and the upcoming lectures will be posted in their aftermath in the coming months.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics. It is free and open to the public. Photo ID is required to enter the building.

 

What now? The roots of the present economic crisis and the way forward: a discussion with David Harvey and Robert Brenner

What now? The roots of the present economic crisis and the way forward: a discussion with David Harvey and Robert Brenner

12/01/2016
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Elebash Recital Hall

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics, the Advanced Research Collaborative and the Center for the Humanities present:

What now? The roots of the present economic crisis and the way forward: a discussion with David Harvey and Robert Brenner

Elebash Recital Hall
Thursday December 1
7.00 pm – 9.00 pm

 

livestreamed here: http://videostreaming.gc.cuny.edu/videos/

whirlwind                                                                                                             Whirlwind, by Marina Ahun

Robert Brenner is Visiting Professor in the Department of Economics at the New School University and author of many books and papers on the early development of capitalism and the current economic crisis. The Brenner Debate on the origins of capitalism to this day remains seminal on this topic. More recently his work –The Boom and the Bubble: the US in the World Economy (London, Verso, 2002) and Economics of Global Turbulence (London, Verso, 2006)–has focused on the fundamental contradictions of contemporary capitalism. His most recent book is The Political Economy of the Rank and File Rebellion in Rebel Rank and File: Labor Militancy and Revolt from Below during the Long 1970s eds. A. Brenner et. al. (London, Verso, 2010)

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the City University of New York (CUNY) and author of various books, articles, and lectures. He is the author of Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism(Profile Books, 2014), one of The Guardian’s(http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/dec/02/books-christmas-presents-economics-reviews“) Best Books of 2011, The Enigma of Capital and the Crises of Capitalism (Oxford University Press, 2010). Other books include A Companion to Marx’s Capital, Limits to Capital, and Social Justice and the City. Professor Harvey has been teaching Karl Marx’s Capital for nearly 40 years. His lectures on Marx’s Volumes I and II are available for download (free) on his website.  He was director of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics from 2008-2014.

This event is sponsored by the Advanced Research Collaborative, Center for Place, Culture and Politics, and Center for the Humanities, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.

11/30: Where do we go from here? Racism, Populism, Fascism and the Future of the Hard Right after the 2016 Election: A Panel Discussion with Abby Scher, Sophie Bjork James, Spencer Sunshine, and Chip Berlet

11/30: Where do we go from here? Racism, Populism, Fascism and the Future of the Hard Right after the 2016 Election: A Panel Discussion with Abby Scher, Sophie Bjork James, Spencer Sunshine, and Chip Berlet

11/30/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

November 30, 2016
6:30 -8:30 pm
Sociology Lounge – 6112

alt-right_trumpThe white supremacist movement and self-described Alt-Right used the Trump presidential campaign to amplify its message and swell its ranks. Neo-Nazis, white nationalists, and militia leaders are celebrating the Trump presidential win as a victory of their own. A panel of experts on right-wing media and movements will discuss what we can expect of the hard right after the stunning Trump victory and how to challenge it.

Crimes against immigrants and Muslims spiked and online harassment of Jewish commentators and journalists was widespread in the midst of the racist rhetoric of the campaign. A September 2016 study by George Washington University’s Program on Extremism found that white nationalist use of social media now far exceeds the online presence of the Islamic State on virtually every social metric. Join us for this important conversation.

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The event was inspired by the publication of Political Research Associates & Rural Organizing Project Release Major Investigation & Toolkit to Aid Oregon Communities Facing Militia Movements

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, the Advanced Research Collaborative, and the Center for Humanities at Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public. Space is limited to 80, and guests will be admitted according to a first come, first serve policy.

 

11/17: The Tale of Tadmetla: Extracts from The Burning Forest

11/17: The Tale of Tadmetla: Extracts from The Burning Forest

11/17/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Skylight Conference Room, 9th Floor

11/17: The Tale of Tadmetla: Extracts from The Burning Forest

November 17, 2016
6:30-8:30 pm
Skylight Room

Nandini Sundar will draw on The Burning Forest to comment on a recent spate of attacks on Adivasi villages by vigilante forces in Bastar. In her new book The Burning Forest: India’s War in Bastar (Juggernaut, 2016), Sundar chronicles how the armed conflict between the government and the Maoists in central India has devastated the lives of some of India’s poorest and most vulnerable citizens. The Burning Forest details how the Salwa Judum – a government sponsored vigilante movement – killed hundreds of adivasis and drove thousands of villagers into camps. The book unravels the links between counterinsurgency and extractive capitalism in what is today one of India’s most militarized regions.

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Speaker: Nandini Sundar, Delhi University

Nandini Sundar is professor of sociology at Delhi University. Her research spans adivasi history and politics, civil wars and counterinsurgency, law and struggles over natural resources, and the intellectual history of anthropology and sociology in India. She is the author of Subalterns and Sovereigns: An Anthropological History of Bastar (Oxford University Press, 1997) and has edited and co-edited a number of books, including The Scheduled Tribes and their India (OUP, 2016) and Civil Wars in South Asia: State, Sovereignty, Development (with Aparna Sundar, Sage, 2014). The winner of the Infosys Prize for Social Sciences in 2010 and the Ester Boserup Prize for Development Research 2016, Sundar is actively engaged in public debate in India. Her public writings are available at nandinisundar.blogspot.in

Discussant: Partha Chatterjee, Columbia University

 

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.

11/16: Film Screening: Où est la démocratie? Where is democracy?

11/16: Film Screening: Où est la démocratie? Where is democracy?

11/16/2016
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

11/16: Film Screening: Où est la démocratie? Where is democracy?

November 16, 2016
6:30-8 pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

Co-producers and directors Marisa Holmes and Bruno Giuliani will be present for a discussion following the screening.

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In France a crisis of liberal democracy has been happening, revealing the violence of the state underneath. In February this year, under the context of a renewed state of emergency, the Socialist Party in power proposed a labor law reform that stripped workers of rights long taken for granted. In response, after a month of protests in the street, a wave of action led by the youth and the workers converged at Place de la République in Paris in an experiment in direct democracy. Où est la démocratie? (Where is democracy?) captures this moment of upheaval that aimed to “overthrow the labor bill and the world it represents”.

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This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.

11/9: Words and Things: Raymond Williams, Late Capitalism, and Keywords for Radicals

11/9: Words and Things: Raymond Williams, Late Capitalism, and Keywords for Radicals

11/09/2016
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Room 6112

11/9:  Words and Things: Raymond Williams, Late Capitalism, and Keywords for Radicals

November 9, 2016

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Sociology Lounge, Room 6112

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics, in Conversation with AK Thompson

In Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976), pioneering cultural materialist Raymond Williams devised a method for revealing how language not only described but also helped to produce the world. By focusing on historical shifts in word usage and meaning and tracing the constellated vocabularies that gave each moment an appearance of stability, Williams revealed how our most intimate utterances could serve as guides to the contradictions at work within the social totality.

Forty years later, Keywords for Radicals: The Contested Vocabulary of Late-Capitalist Struggle was published with the aim of applying Williams’ method to the contests over word usage and meaning that have become so central to contemporary activist projects. In addition to its more particular focus on the radical milieu, however, Keywords for Radicals also had to contend with late capitalism’s shifting epistemology. How does one submit language to historical scrutiny, for instance, when history itself has become a conceptually indeterminate proposition?

In this public dialogue, Keywords for Radicals co-editor AK Thompson will review Williams’ method in light of the new terrain to highlight its enduring relevance while demonstrating how it might be modified to address the epistemological challenges posed by the cultural logic of late capitalism.

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AK Thompson got kicked out of high school for publishing an underground newspaper called The Agitator and has been an activist, writer, and social theorist ever since. Currently teaching social theory at Fordham University, his publications include Black Bloc, White Riot: Anti-Globalization and the Genealogy of Dissent (2010) and Sociology for Changing the World: Social Movements/Social Research (2006). Between 2005 and 2012, he served on the Editorial Committee of Upping The Anti: A Journal of Theory and Action.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics, Graduate Center, CUNY. It is free and open to the public.
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